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The shallows : what the Internet is doing to our brains

Author: Nicholas G Carr
Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
As we enjoy the Internet's bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Carr describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by "tools of the mind"--from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer--and interweaves recent discoveries in neuroscience. Now, he expands his argument into a compelling exploration of the Internet's intellectual and  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Nicholas G Carr
ISBN: 0393339750 9780393339758
OCLC Number: 699724425
Notes: "With a new afterword"--Cover.
Awards: Finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction
Description: 280 p. ; 21 cm.
Contents: Prologue: The watchdog and the thief --
Hal and me --
The vital paths --
On what the brain thinks about when it thinks about itself --
Tools of the mind --
The deepening page --
On Lee de Forest and his amazing audion --
A medium of the most general nature --
The very image of a book --
The juggler's brain --
On the buoyancy of IQ scores --
The church of Google --
Search, memory --
On the writing of this book --
A thing like me --
Human elements.
Responsibility: Nicholas Carr.

Abstract:

The bestselling author of "The Big Switch" returns with an explosive look at technology's effect on the mind.  Read more...

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Nicholas Carr has written an important and timely book. See if you can stay off the web long enough to read it! --Elizabeth Kolbert, author of Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Read more...

 
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schema:description"As we enjoy the Internet's bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Carr describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by "tools of the mind"--from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer--and interweaves recent discoveries in neuroscience. Now, he expands his argument into a compelling exploration of the Internet's intellectual and cultural consequences. Our brains, scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. Building on insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a case that every information technology carries a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. The printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In contrast, the Internet encourages rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information. As we become ever more adept at scanning and skimming, are we losing our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection?--From publisher description."
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