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Shaw and Joyce : the last word in stolentelling

Author: Martha Fodaski Black
Publisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, ©1995.
Series: Florida James Joyce series.
Edition/Format:   eBook : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This controversial and groundbreaking book - certain to provoke Joyce scholars - documents the heretofore under observed influence of George Bernard Shaw on James Joyce. In painstaking detail, Martha Fodaski Black addresses Joyce's "stolentelling" from Shaw, maintaining that Joyce employed literary ruses to obscure the relationship between himself and his Irish predecessor - stratagems that argue for Joyce's own
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Black, Martha Fodaski.
Shaw and Joyce.
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c1995
(DLC) 94027516
(OCoLC)30811628
Named Person: James Joyce; Bernard Shaw
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Martha Fodaski Black
ISBN: 0813019109 9780813019109
OCLC Number: 44954653
Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 445 p.)
Contents: Foreword / Bernard Benstock --
The case for Joyce's "Piously forged Palimpsests" of "Lamppost Shawe" --
"Sonny" George and "Sunny" Jim: "Frother" and his "Doblinganger" --
The devil's disciple and his great "Immensipater": Stephen Hero, a portrait of the artist as a young man, and exiles. "Fruting for firstlings" --
"A true covenanter against the world": Stephen Hero. A portrait of the artist as a young Shavian: "O foenix culprit!" Carmen in the drawing-room: "Annadominant" "Candidatus" in exiles --
Tripartite Dubliners: "Circumcivisizing" the quintessential Dublin. "Yung and easily freudened": Dublin boys. "Lawanorder on loveinardor": Dublin's destructive ideals. "Our liffeyside people": Philistines in Dublin --
The great "Immensipater" "Retaled" in Bloom & Co.: Ulysses. The credible androgyne: "Such is manowife's lot to lose and win again" Irish nationalism: "The vilest bogeyer but most attractionable avatar."
Series Title: Florida James Joyce series.
Other Titles: Shaw & Joyce
Responsibility: Martha Fodaski Black.

Abstract:

This controversial and groundbreaking book - certain to provoke Joyce scholars - documents the heretofore under observed influence of George Bernard Shaw on James Joyce. In painstaking detail, Martha Fodaski Black addresses Joyce's "stolentelling" from Shaw, maintaining that Joyce employed literary ruses to obscure the relationship between himself and his Irish predecessor - stratagems that argue for Joyce's own originality. Shaw and Joyce were both literary pickpockets, like most writers, but Shaw (unlike Joyce) readily admitted his sources. Black seeks "to restore Shaw's reputation, to prove that the crafty Joyce secretly approved of and used the old leprechaun playwright, and to quarrel with critics who isolate texts from the faces behind them."

Black finds "pervasive and indubitable connections" especially between Finnegans Wake and Back to Methuselah, culminating in the subterranean conflict between the father/brother ("frother") Shaun and the "penman" Shem in the Wake. But ultimately she shows that Shaw's influence on Joyce was ubiquitous: while the younger writer followed his own muse as a stylist, the "germs" of all his themes "are in the polemics, prefaces, and plays of the famous Fabian." A critical pragmatist, Black draws on an eclectic blend of sociological/psychological and feminist insights to produce an analysis "accessible to readers who are not specialists in structuralism, deconstruction, manuscript analysis, or any of the critical isms." Given the controversial nature of "The Last Word in Stolentelling," it will find partisan readers among Joyce and Shaw scholars as well as others interested in Irish literature and literary theory.

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