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Shifting grounds : feminist dialogism, narrative strategies, and constructions of self in works by four U.S. women writers

Autore: Ann E Reuman
Editore: ©1998.
Tesi: Thesis (Ph. D.)--Tufts University, 1998.
Edizione/Formato:   Tesi/dissertazione : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
Working at the conjunction of feminist and Bakhtinian theory and focusing particularly on Paula Gunn Allen's The Woman Who Owned the Shadows (1983), Gloria Anzaldua's Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (1987), Audre Lorde's Zami: A New Spelling of My Name (1982), and Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping (1980), I examine the ways in which four U.S. women writers, linked by a legacy of racism and colonialism yet
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Dettagli

Genere/forma: History
Persona incaricata: Gloria Anzaldúa; Marilynne Robinson; Paula Gunn Allen; Audre Lorde; Paula Gunn Allen; Gloria Anzaldúa; Audre Lorde; Marilynne Robinson
Tipo materiale: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Tipo documento: Book, Archival Material
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Ann E Reuman
Numero OCLC: 43437124
Note: Submitted to the Dept. of English.
Descrizione: vi, 328 leaves : 29 cm.
Altri titoli: Feminist dialogism, narrative strategies, and constructions of self in works by four U.S. women writers
Responsabilità: by Ann E. Reuman.

Abstract:

Working at the conjunction of feminist and Bakhtinian theory and focusing particularly on Paula Gunn Allen's The Woman Who Owned the Shadows (1983), Gloria Anzaldua's Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (1987), Audre Lorde's Zami: A New Spelling of My Name (1982), and Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping (1980), I examine the ways in which four U.S. women writers, linked by a legacy of racism and colonialism yet grounded in specific identities and heritages, expose conflictual American histories, define and disrupt boundaries in constructions of identity and genre, transform cultural myths to propose an American aesthetics of hybridity, challenge postmodern despiritualization, and propose ways of shifting the grounds of our thinking without reinscribing systems of dominance. In their recuperation of sacred tales of historically specific struggle and female power and in their politicized narrative forms, I argue, Allen, Anzaldua, Robinson, and Lorde make visible hidden structures of power, challenge dominant western notions of opposition, "reality," agency, "feminism," resistance, and art, destabilize traditionally privileged American narratives that are Eurocentric, male-centered, "universal," linear, monolingual, and generically "pure," locate a space for American women's writing and theorizing that includes previously subjugated knowledge, multi-voicedness, and multiple, mobile subjectivities, reveal "productive violences" that shake complacent "readers" out of unquestioning belief in supposed certainties, and link storytelling and collective memory to political consciousness and constructions of self.

My research extends current critical and feminist debate regarding identity and difference by theorizing relational negotiation as a major feminist paradigm; it questions American notions of isolated authorship and of the novel as the most significant literary form; it addresses the importance of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality as socio-historical factors in the formation of art; and it considers how feminist dialogism in literature applies to curricular and pedagogical choices as well as to cross-cultural relations in America today.

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