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Shinto : origins, rituals, festivals, spirits, sacred places

Author: C Scott Littleton
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In Japan, two religions predominate--Buddhism and Shintoism--and the Japanese people see no contradiction in practicing both: worshipping Buddha even as they revere the kami, the divine beings that populate the country and define the indigenous faith of Shintoism. In Shintoism and the Religions of Japan, C. Scott Littleton illuminates this unusual spiritual pluralism and shows how it has fertilized a vast and varied  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Littleton, C. Scott.
Shinto.
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002
(OCoLC)649718003
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: C Scott Littleton
ISBN: 0195218868 9780195218862
OCLC Number: 49664424
Description: 112 p. : col. ill. ; 21 cm.
Contents: Origins and historical development --
Aspects of the divine --
Sacred texts --
Sacred persons --
Ethical principles --
Sacred space --
Sacred time --
Death and the afterlife --
Society and religion.
Responsibility: C. Scott Littleton.
More information:

Abstract:

In Japan, two religions predominate--Buddhism and Shintoism--and the Japanese people see no contradiction in practicing both: worshipping Buddha even as they revere the kami, the divine beings that populate the country and define the indigenous faith of Shintoism. In Shintoism and the Religions of Japan, C. Scott Littleton illuminates this unusual spiritual pluralism and shows how it has fertilized a vast and varied religious landscape. Littleton describes the origins and development of Shinto (or Kami no Michi, "Way of the Gods"), the introduction of Buddhism a millennium and a half ago, the rise of various sects of Buddhism (some indigenous to Japan), and the role of the imperial court and the shogunate in the nation's religious life. Here too is a clear and succinct summary of Shintoism's teeming pantheon of spiritual figures, the holy writings of Shintoism, and the islands' landscape of holy sanctuaries. Littleton explains how Buddhism has been reinterpreted in light of Japan's indigenous traditions (some monumental statues of the Buddha are worshipped as manifestations of kami), and describes the "new religions" that flourished during the Meiji period of the late nineteenth century, after Japan once again opened up to the outside world. Writing with grace and clarity, he captures the essential features of Japanese religious life, including the countless local festivals and rituals, the importance of harmony and enlightenment, and concepts of death and salvation.

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