skip to content
Shiny objects : why we spend money we don't have in search of happiness we can't buy Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

Shiny objects : why we spend money we don't have in search of happiness we can't buy

Author: James A Roberts
Publisher: New York : HarperOne, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Summary:
Roberts, professor of marketing at Baylor University, studies why Americans believe and behave as if possessions will induce, increase, and enhance happiness. His inquiry provides ample psychological and historical insights as well as self-assessment quizzes on how much we spend and how vulnerable we are to status anxiety.
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James A Roberts
ISBN: 9780062093608 0062093606 9780061936647 0061936642
OCLC Number: 526084214
Description: xi, 353 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Shiny objects --
Chasing the American dream --
The American dream on steroids --
The cat's out of the (shopping) bag --
The treadmill of consumption --
The cashless society --
Money's hidden costs : sacrificing our life goals --
Collateral damage : relationships --
Why are we so materialistic? --
Heaven help us : the prosperity gospel --
Weapons of mass consumption --
The three ingredients of self-control --
Step away from the shopping cart : environmental programming for consumers --
The carrot and the stick : behavioral programming for consumers --
Your money or your life.
Responsibility: James A. Roberts.

Abstract:

Roberts, professor of marketing at Baylor University, studies why Americans believe and behave as if possessions will induce, increase, and enhance happiness. His inquiry provides ample psychological and historical insights as well as self-assessment quizzes on how much we spend and how vulnerable we are to status anxiety.
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.