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Should race matter? : unusual answers to the usual questions

Author: David Boonin
Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In this book, philosopher David Boonin attempts to answer the moral questions raised by five important and widely contested racial practices: slave reparations, affirmative action, hate speech restrictions, hate crime laws, and racial profiling. Arguing from premises that virtually everyone on both sides of the debates over these issues already accepts, Boonin arrives at an unusual and unorthodox set of  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David Boonin
ISBN: 9780521760867 0521760860 9780521149808 0521149800
OCLC Number: 700205678
Notes: Machine generated contents note: 1. Thinking in black and white; 2. Repairing the slave reparations debate; 3. Advancing the slave reparations debate; 4. One cheer for affirmative action; 5. Two cheers for affirmative action; 6. Why I used to hate hate speech restrictions; 7. Why I still hate hate speech restrictions; 8. How to stop worrying and learn to love hate crime laws; 9. How to keep on loving hate crime laws; 10. Is racial profiling irrational?; 11. Is racial profiling immoral?
Description: x, 411 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Thinking in black and white: an introduction to the moral questions that America's past raises about its present --
Repairing the slave reparations debate: how I got into an argument with myself about David Horowitz and lost --
Advancing the slave reparations debate: bonus objections, bonus responses, and a modest proposal --
One cheer for affirmative action: why there's nothing wrong with abandoning racial preferences --
Two cheers for affirmative action: why there's nothing wrong with not abandoning racial preferences, either --
Why I used to hate hate speech restrictions: appeals to traditional exceptions to freedom of expression and why they all fail --
Why I still hate hate speech restrictions: new and improved exceptions to freedom of expression and why they fail, too --
How to stop worrying and learn to love hate crime laws: why objections to hate speech restrictions don't work as objections to hate crime laws --
How to keep on loving hate crime laws: why other objections to hate crime laws don't work, either --
Is racial profiling irrational?: the answer isn't black and white --
Is racial profiling immoral?: a reluctant defense of America's least popular form of discrimination.
Responsibility: David Boonin.

Abstract:

"In this book, philosopher David Boonin attempts to answer the moral questions raised by five important and widely contested racial practices: slave reparations, affirmative action, hate speech restrictions, hate crime laws, and racial profiling. Arguing from premises that virtually everyone on both sides of the debates over these issues already accepts, Boonin arrives at an unusual and unorthodox set of conclusions, one that is neither liberal nor conservative, color conscious nor color blind. Defended with the rigor that has characterized his previous work but written in a more widely accessible style, this provocative and important new book is sure to spark controversy and should be of interest to philosophers, legal theorists, and anyone interested in trying to resolve the debate over these important and divisive issues"--

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Linked Data


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