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Sick people or sick societies?

Author: Jill Eisen; Paul Kennedy; Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Publisher: [Ottawa] : CBC Radio One, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"We are healthier than ever before, and we live longer, but improvements in health are not distributed evenly. The rich outlive the middle classes, who outlive the poor. Swedes and Japanese live longer than Canadians, and Canadians, longer than Americans. Freelance journalist Jill Eisen discovers that the reasons have little to do with our health care systems" -- Vive Le Canada website.
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Details

Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Jill Eisen; Paul Kennedy; Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
OCLC Number: 320248338
Notes: Audio adaptation by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Originally broadcast on Ideas, a CBC radio, c2007.
Title from container.
Performer(s): Narrated by Jill Eisen and hosted by Paul Kennedy.
Description: 2 compact discs (ca. 52 min. each) : digital ; 12 cm.
Other Titles: Ideas (Radio Program)

Abstract:

"We are healthier than ever before, and we live longer, but improvements in health are not distributed evenly. The rich outlive the middle classes, who outlive the poor. Swedes and Japanese live longer than Canadians, and Canadians, longer than Americans. Freelance journalist Jill Eisen discovers that the reasons have little to do with our health care systems" -- Vive Le Canada website.

Part One: Eisen speaks with S. Leonard Syme, Richard Glazier, Carol Shively, and Michael Marmot to explore the ideas of social determinants, evidence for the relevance of stress to the "modern" diseases, and the moral and practical obligations we have to demand action.

Part Two: Eisen speaks with Dennis Raphael, Richard Glazier, Clyde Hertzman, explores the related obesity and diabetes epidemics, early childhood development. The program ends with an interesting commentary from Raphael regarding why, despite overwhelming evidence, governments continuously fail to address social threats to health.

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