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The Silver Burdett Company : a critical study of the collaborative publishing process

Author: Carolyn T Coyle
Publisher: 1998.
Dissertation: Thesis (Ed. D.)--Lehigh University, 1999.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Within educational publishing today, products are developed through a collaborative process from a project's conception through the delivery of the finished product: the textbooks. The purpose of the study was to examine textbook publishing through a case study which includes a history of the Silver Burdett Company. It was the intention of this study to analyze the collaborative work process within educational
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Details

Genre/Form: Academic dissertations
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Archival Material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Carolyn T Coyle
OCLC Number: 41550479
Notes: Includes vita.
Description: x, 152 leaves : charts ; 29 cm.
Other Titles: Critical study of the collaborative publishing process.
Responsibility: by Carolyn T. Coyle.
More information:

Abstract:

Within educational publishing today, products are developed through a collaborative process from a project's conception through the delivery of the finished product: the textbooks. The purpose of the study was to examine textbook publishing through a case study which includes a history of the Silver Burdett Company. It was the intention of this study to analyze the collaborative work process within educational publishing and to establish a valid relationship between this process and the collaborative work ethic existing within the realm of research. More specifically, the study examined successful and unsuccessful behaviors conducive to the development of an end product.

The critical incident technique, developed by Flanagan (1954), was used to collect data from project team members. Throughout the month of July 1998, 60 project team members responded to four questions that included positive and negative critical incidents involving the influential behaviors affecting the collaborative publishing process. The researcher sorted responses to three questions (189 usable incidents) by common themes that presented six main categories. The categories and percentages in relation to total incidents were: Communication (37.6%), Leadership (22.8%), Teamwork (17.8%), Timeframe (17.2%), Location (7.9%), and End Product (3.7%). Of the 189 critical incidents reported, 100 (52.9%) were classified as positive and 89 (47.1%) were classified as negative. A fourth question asked for main ingredients, more specifically "team basics", which contribute to the success of the collaborative publishing process. Although not incorporated into the usable incidents of the study, the 101 responses to this question were classified in the same fashion to maintain consistency in analyzing the data. Project team members identified relevant behaviors supporting core foundations contributing to successful team performance.

Cumulatively, the behaviors of project team members suggested that the collaborative publishing process is successful. Strong indicators of this generalization were the significant positive responses in the categories of both communication and end product, the textbooks. It can be inferred that leadership, teamwork, effective team management, and attributes of pods are critical to the success of the collaborative publishing process and the absence of these contribute to failure.

The limitations and findings of this study suggest additional research on this topic. Further investigations to understand publishing processes, a collaborative work ethic, and the positive and negative influences that impact success are recommended.

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