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Sir John Harington and the book as gift

Author: Jason Scott-Warren
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Sir John Harington (1560-1612) has long been recognized as one of the most colourful and engaging figures at the English Renaissance court. Godson of Queen Elizabeth, translator of Ariosto, and inventor of the water-closet, he was also a lively writer in a wide variety of modes, and an acute commentator on his times. This study opens a new perspective on Harington's literary production by attending to the fact that  Read more...
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Named Person: John Harington, Sir; John Harington
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Jason Scott-Warren
ISBN: 0199244456 9780199244454
OCLC Number: 47636642
Description: x, 273 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Contents: 1. Harington, Ariosto, and the Textual Economy of the Court --
2. Privy Politics --
3. Out of the Closet --
4. Part of the Furniture --
5. Forging the Future --
6. Producing Prophecy --
7. Elizabeth's Witty Godson under James.
Responsibility: Jason Scott-Warren.
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Abstract:

This book offers an innovative reassessment of one of the most colourful denizens of the English Renaissance court, Sir John Harington (1560-1612). Based upon a wealth of new evidence, it shows how  Read more...

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Scott-Warren's analysis is erudite and sometimes displays a wit worthy of the man who is its subject. It is always lively, and often provocative ... Sir John Harington and the Book as Gift can be Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Sir John Harington (1560-1612) has long been recognized as one of the most colourful and engaging figures at the English Renaissance court. Godson of Queen Elizabeth, translator of Ariosto, and inventor of the water-closet, he was also a lively writer in a wide variety of modes, and an acute commentator on his times. This study opens a new perspective on Harington's literary production by attending to the fact that almost all of his writings were designed as gifts. Combining detailed readings and first-hand historical research, Jason Scott-Warren reconstructs the complex, often devious agenda which Harington wrote into his books as he customized them for specific individuals and occasions. Offering a wealth of insights into self-fashioning and the pursuit of patronage, this study makes a persuasive case for the significance of material culture to textual interpretation. It will be of interest to all who work on the early modern period, and in particular to historians of the book."--BOOK JACKET."
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