skip to content
Skeletons of terrestrial cetaceans and the relationship of whales to artiodactyls.
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Skeletons of terrestrial cetaceans and the relationship of whales to artiodactyls.

Author: JG Thewissen Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine, Rootstown, Ohio 44272, USA. thewisse@neoucom.edu; EM Williams; LJ Roe; ST Hussain
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Nature, 2001 Sep 20; 413(6853): 277-81
Database:From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Other Databases: British Library SerialsArticleFirst
Summary:
Modern members of the mammalian order Cetacea (whales, dolphins and porpoises) are obligate aquatic swimmers that are highly distinctive in morphology, lacking hair and hind limbs, and having flippers, flukes, and a streamlined body. Eocene fossils document much of cetaceans' land-to-water transition, but, until now, the most primitive representative for which a skeleton was known was clearly amphibious and lived in  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

 

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: JG Thewissen Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine, Rootstown, Ohio 44272, USA. thewisse@neoucom.edu; EM Williams; LJ Roe; ST Hussain
ISSN:0028-0836
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 118116179
Awards:

Abstract:

Modern members of the mammalian order Cetacea (whales, dolphins and porpoises) are obligate aquatic swimmers that are highly distinctive in morphology, lacking hair and hind limbs, and having flippers, flukes, and a streamlined body. Eocene fossils document much of cetaceans' land-to-water transition, but, until now, the most primitive representative for which a skeleton was known was clearly amphibious and lived in coastal environments. Here we report on the skeletons of two early Eocene pakicetid cetaceans, the fox-sized Ichthyolestes pinfoldi, and the wolf-sized Pakicetus attocki. Their skeletons also elucidate the relationships of cetaceans to other mammals. Morphological cladistic analyses have shown cetaceans to be most closely related to one or more mesonychians, a group of extinct, archaic ungulates, but molecular analyses have indicated that they are the sister group to hippopotamids. Our cladistic analysis indicates that cetaceans are more closely related to artiodactyls than to any mesonychian. Cetaceans are not the sister group to (any) mesonychians, nor to hippopotamids. Our analysis stops short of identifying any particular artiodactyl family as the cetacean sister group and supports monophyly of artiodactyls.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/118116179>
library:oclcnum"118116179"
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/118116179>
rdf:typeschema:Article
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2001-09-20"
schema:description"Modern members of the mammalian order Cetacea (whales, dolphins and porpoises) are obligate aquatic swimmers that are highly distinctive in morphology, lacking hair and hind limbs, and having flippers, flukes, and a streamlined body. Eocene fossils document much of cetaceans' land-to-water transition, but, until now, the most primitive representative for which a skeleton was known was clearly amphibious and lived in coastal environments. Here we report on the skeletons of two early Eocene pakicetid cetaceans, the fox-sized Ichthyolestes pinfoldi, and the wolf-sized Pakicetus attocki. Their skeletons also elucidate the relationships of cetaceans to other mammals. Morphological cladistic analyses have shown cetaceans to be most closely related to one or more mesonychians, a group of extinct, archaic ungulates, but molecular analyses have indicated that they are the sister group to hippopotamids. Our cladistic analysis indicates that cetaceans are more closely related to artiodactyls than to any mesonychian. Cetaceans are not the sister group to (any) mesonychians, nor to hippopotamids. Our analysis stops short of identifying any particular artiodactyl family as the cetacean sister group and supports monophyly of artiodactyls."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/79084248>
schema:isPartOf
schema:isPartOf
schema:name"Skeletons of terrestrial cetaceans and the relationship of whales to artiodactyls."
schema:pageStart"277"
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.