skip to content
Skin Deep. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Skin Deep.

Author: Kanopy (Firm)
Publisher: [San Francisco, California, USA] : Kanopy Streaming, 2015.
Edition/Format:   eVideo : Clipart/images/graphics
Summary:
For hundreds of years, human skin colour has been used as a marker of race. Now, science is uncovering the intricate relationship between skin colour and environment. When our ancient ancestors in Equatorial Africa lost their body hair and ventured out into the open savannah, their skin had to become dark to resist strong UV radiation. Perfectly adapted to the environment, the black skin of Africans is one of  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Clipart/images/graphics, Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File, Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Kanopy (Firm)
OCLC Number: 921956563
Language Note: In English.
Notes: Title from title frames.
In Process Record.
Event notes: Originally produced by Electric Pictures in 2010.
Description: 1 online resource (streaming video file)
More information:

Abstract:

For hundreds of years, human skin colour has been used as a marker of race. Now, science is uncovering the intricate relationship between skin colour and environment. When our ancient ancestors in Equatorial Africa lost their body hair and ventured out into the open savannah, their skin had to become dark to resist strong UV radiation. Perfectly adapted to the environment, the black skin of Africans is one of Nature's greatest achievements for the survival of the human species. This may not sound new, but in 2000, Penn State University anthropologist Nina Jablonski proposed a startling new explanation as to why human skin has so many colours. Her study suggested that pigmentation did not evolve to prevent skin cancer, but primarily to help the human body maintain the right balance of two crucial vitamins essential for reproduction and body development. As a result, skin colour developed as a perfect compromise: allowing enough sunlight to stimulate the production of Vitamin D, but screening the body from harmful rays that destroy folic acid - a vitamin necessary for reproductive success. Focusing on ground-breaking research and personal accounts of scientists around the world, this documentary reveals that the evolution of skin colour is solely an adaptation to the environment. It drives home a powerful message: judging people on the basis of colour is not only morally unacceptable, it is scientifically wrong. Director: Franco Di Chiera Awards: Nominated as a Finalist for United Nations Association of Australia Media Peace Award, 2011. Selected for screening at Pariscience, International Science Film Festival, 2011. Selected for the Travelling Festival Program and Official Competition, SCINEMA, 2011.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/921956563> # Skin Deep.
    a schema:VideoObject, schema:CreativeWork, schema:Movie ;
    library:oclcnum "921956563" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/cau> ;
    rdfs:comment "Unknown 'gen' value: cig" ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/496554559#Thing/environmental_sciences> ; # Environmental Sciences
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/496554559#Thing/race_and_class_studies> ; # Race and Class Studies
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/496554559#Organization/kanopy_firm> ; # Kanopy (Firm)
    schema:description "For hundreds of years, human skin colour has been used as a marker of race. Now, science is uncovering the intricate relationship between skin colour and environment. When our ancient ancestors in Equatorial Africa lost their body hair and ventured out into the open savannah, their skin had to become dark to resist strong UV radiation. Perfectly adapted to the environment, the black skin of Africans is one of Nature's greatest achievements for the survival of the human species. This may not sound new, but in 2000, Penn State University anthropologist Nina Jablonski proposed a startling new explanation as to why human skin has so many colours. Her study suggested that pigmentation did not evolve to prevent skin cancer, but primarily to help the human body maintain the right balance of two crucial vitamins essential for reproduction and body development. As a result, skin colour developed as a perfect compromise: allowing enough sunlight to stimulate the production of Vitamin D, but screening the body from harmful rays that destroy folic acid - a vitamin necessary for reproductive success. Focusing on ground-breaking research and personal accounts of scientists around the world, this documentary reveals that the evolution of skin colour is solely an adaptation to the environment. It drives home a powerful message: judging people on the basis of colour is not only morally unacceptable, it is scientifically wrong. Director: Franco Di Chiera Awards: Nominated as a Finalist for United Nations Association of Australia Media Peace Award, 2011. Selected for screening at Pariscience, International Science Film Festival, 2011. Selected for the Travelling Festival Program and Official Competition, SCINEMA, 2011." ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/496554559> ;
    schema:name "Skin Deep." ;
    schema:productID "921956563" ;
    schema:url <http://institution.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <http://nhfpl.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <https://grinnell.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://grinnell.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <http://ucsb.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <http://eiu.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <http://queenslibrary.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <http://umass.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <http://nolalibrary.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <http://uvic.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    schema:url <http://www.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/921956563> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://eiu.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703>
    rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video, access limited to EIU students, faculty and staff" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/496554559#Thing/environmental_sciences> # Environmental Sciences
    a schema:Thing ;
    schema:name "Environmental Sciences" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/496554559#Thing/race_and_class_studies> # Race and Class Studies
    a schema:Thing ;
    schema:name "Race and Class Studies" ;
    .

<http://institution.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703>
    rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video" ;
    .

<http://nhfpl.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703>
    rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video" ;
    .

<http://nolalibrary.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703>
    rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video" ;
    .

<http://ucsb.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703>
    rdfs:comment "Access restricted to UCSB IP addresses" ;
    .

<http://umass.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703>
    rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video" ;
    .

<http://www.kanopystreaming.com/node/71703>
    rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.