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Slavery and freedom

Author: Meighan MaloneyKristian BergDavid DavisJohn LindsayMary KadderlyAll authors
Publisher: S. Burlington, Vt. : Annenberg/CPB, 2003, ©2002.
Series: American passages : a literary survey, 7.
Edition/Format:   VHS video : VHS tape   Visual material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
How has slavery shaped the American literary imagination and American identity? This program turns to the classic slave narratives of Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass and the fiction of Harriet Beecher Stowe. What rhetorical strategies do their works use to construct an authentic and authoritative American self?
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Named Person: Harriet A Jacobs; Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe
Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Meighan Maloney; Kristian Berg; David Davis; John Lindsay; Mary Kadderly; Oregon Public Broadcasting.; Annenberg/CPB.; Crossroads Project (American Studies Association)
ISBN: 1576805646 9781576805640
OCLC Number: 51672798
Language Note: Close-captioned.
Notes: "American Passages : A Literary Survey was created in association with the American Studies Crossroads Project of the American Studies Association"--Container.
Credits: Series producer, Meighan Maloney ; executive producers, David Davis, John Lindsay ; editors, Kelly Norris, Ben Nieves ; music, Cal Scott.
Performer(s): Narrator, Mary Kadderly.
Description: 1 videocassette (ca. 30 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.
Details: VHS.
Series Title: American passages : a literary survey, 7.
Responsibility: writer, Kristian Berg ; Annenberg/CPB, Oregon Public Broadcasting.
More information:

Abstract:

How has slavery shaped the American literary imagination and American identity? This program turns to the classic slave narratives of Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass and the fiction of Harriet Beecher Stowe. What rhetorical strategies do their works use to construct an authentic and authoritative American self?

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