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"So has a daisy vanished" : Emily Dickinson and tuberculosis

Author: George Mamunes
Publisher: Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Examines the ways in which Dickinson's literary style was affected by her experiences with tuberculosis. An in-depth discussion on 73 of Dickinson's poems provides readers with a fresh perspective on her notoriously shut-in lifestyle, her complicated relationship with the tuberculosis-stricken Benjamin Franklin Newton, and the possible real-life inspirations for her "terror since September.""--Provided by publisher.
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Mamunes, George, 1938-
"So has a daisy vanished"
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008
(OCoLC)608239565
Online version:
Mamunes, George, 1938-
"So has a daisy vanished"
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008
(OCoLC)608417524
Named Person: Emily Dickinson; Emily Dickinson; Emily Dickinson; Emily Dickinson
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: George Mamunes
ISBN: 9780786432271 0786432276
OCLC Number: 166290735
Description: xi, 199 p. ; 23 cm.
Responsibility: George Mamunes.
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Abstract:

Places Emily Dickinson's poetry in a new setting, examining the many ways in which Dickinson's literary style was affected by her experiences with tuberculosis and her growing fear of contracting the  Read more...

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"Well researched" - Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin."

 
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