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A social history of knowledge : from Gutenberg to Diderot, based on the first series of Vonhoff Lectures given at the University of Groningen (Netherlands)

Author: Peter Burke
Publisher: Cambridge, UK : Polity Press ; Malden, Mass. : Blackwell Publishers, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In this book Peter Burke adopts a socio-cultural approach to examine the changes in the organisation of knowledge in Europe from the invention of printing to the publication of the French Encyclopedie. The book opens with an assessment of different sociologies of knowledge from Mannheim to Foucault and beyond, and goes on to discuss intellectuals as a social group and the social institutions (especially  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Peter Burke
ISBN: 0745624847 9780745624846 0745624855 9780745624853
OCLC Number: 43978197
Description: vii, 268 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.
Contents: Sociologies and histories of knowledge: an introduction --
Professing knowledge: the European clerisy --
Establishing knowledge: institutions old and new --
Locating knowledge: centres and peripheries --
Classifying knowledge: curricula, libraries and encyclopaedias --
Controlling knowledge: churches and states --
Selling knowledge: the market and the press --
Acquiring knowledge: the reader's share --
Trusting and distrusting knowledge: a coda.
Responsibility: Peter Burke.
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Abstract:

In this work Peter Burke adopts a socio-cultural approach to examine the changes in the organization of knowledge in Europe, from the invention of printing, to the publication of the French  Read more...

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schema:reviewBody""In this book Peter Burke adopts a socio-cultural approach to examine the changes in the organisation of knowledge in Europe from the invention of printing to the publication of the French Encyclopedie. The book opens with an assessment of different sociologies of knowledge from Mannheim to Foucault and beyond, and goes on to discuss intellectuals as a social group and the social institutions (especially universities and academies) which encouraged or discouraged intellectual innovation. Then, in a series of separate chapters, Burke explores the geography, anthropology, politics and economics of knowledge, focusing on the role of cities, academies, states and markets in the process of gathering, classifying, spreading and sometimes concealing information. The final chapters deal with knowledge from the point of view of the individual reader, listener, viewer or consumer, including the problem of the reliability of knowledge discussed so vigorously in the seventeenth century. One of the most original features of this book is its discussion of knowledges in the plural. It centres on printed knowledge, especially academic knowledge, but it treats the history of the knowledge 'explosion' which followed the invention of printing and the discovery of the world beyond Europe as a process of exchange or negotiation between different knowledges, such as male and female, theoretical and practical, high-status and low-status, and European and non-European. Although written primarily as a contribution to social or socio-cultural history, this book will also be of interest to historians of science, sociologists, anthropologists, geographers and others in another age of information explosion."--BOOK JACKET."
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