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Social Organization of the Nuthatch Sitta europaea asiatica
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Social Organization of the Nuthatch Sitta europaea asiatica

Author: Vladimir V Pravosudov
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Ornis Scandinavica (Scandinavian Journal of Ornithology) v24 n4 (19931001): 290-296
Summary:
An individually marked population of the Nuthatch Sitta europaea asiatica was followed during 1986-1990 in the southern part of the Magadan region, Northeastern Siberia. As in European populations of the species, adult Nuthatches were strictly sedentary and lived their lives in permanent territories. Nuthatch territories in Siberia were much larger (averaging 30.2 ha) than those in Europe (about 2-10 ha). Pairs  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Vladimir V Pravosudov
ISSN:0030-5693
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5550766635
Awards:

Abstract:

An individually marked population of the Nuthatch Sitta europaea asiatica was followed during 1986-1990 in the southern part of the Magadan region, Northeastern Siberia. As in European populations of the species, adult Nuthatches were strictly sedentary and lived their lives in permanent territories. Nuthatch territories in Siberia were much larger (averaging 30.2 ha) than those in Europe (about 2-10 ha). Pairs persisted as long as both partners were alive. On average, 50.8% of the pairs survived from one breeding season to the next, a figure very similar to those given for European populations. Young Nuthatches dispersed widely after becoming independent and birds which were born in the study plot were never found later. In contrast to Europe where juveniles always establish their own territories, juveniles in Siberia settled inside the territories of old birds in autumn (usually 1-2 juveniles in the territory of an adult pair). Inside the adults' territory, the juveniles lived in pairs or alone, but never in flocks. Their only chance to become breeders was to replace an adult that died. The first-settled juveniles had the best chance to obtain breeding status. Therefore, although the social organization of the European and Siberian subspecies of S. europaea are similar in many ways, there is a dramatic difference in the way that juveniles establish their territories.

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Primary Entity

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An individually marked population of the Nuthatch Sitta europaea asiatica was followed during 1986-1990 in the southern part of the Magadan region, Northeastern Siberia. As in European populations of the species, adult Nuthatches were strictly sedentary and lived their lives in permanent territories. Nuthatch territories in Siberia were much larger (averaging 30.2 ha) than those in Europe (about 2-10 ha). Pairs persisted as long as both partners were alive. On average, 50.8% of the pairs survived from one breeding season to the next, a figure very similar to those given for European populations. Young Nuthatches dispersed widely after becoming independent and birds which were born in the study plot were never found later. In contrast to Europe where juveniles always establish their own territories, juveniles in Siberia settled inside the territories of old birds in autumn (usually 1-2 juveniles in the territory of an adult pair). Inside the adults' territory, the juveniles lived in pairs or alone, but never in flocks. Their only chance to become breeders was to replace an adult that died. The first-settled juveniles had the best chance to obtain breeding status. Therefore, although the social organization of the European and Siberian subspecies of S. europaea are similar in many ways, there is a dramatic difference in the way that juveniles establish their territories.

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