skip to content
Social : why our brains are wired to connect Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Social : why our brains are wired to connect

Author: Matthew D Lieberman
Publisher: New York : Crown Publishers, [2013]
Edition/Format:   Book : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
We are profoundly social creatures. Here, renowned psychologist Matthew Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience revealing that our need to connect with other people is even more fundamental than our need for food or shelter. Because of this, our brain uses its spare time to learn about the social world--other people and our relation to them. He argues that our need to reach out to and  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Matthew D Lieberman
ISBN: 9780307889096 0307889092
OCLC Number: 830668575
Description: x, 374 pages ; 22 cm
Contents: Who are we? --
The brains' passion --
Broken hearts and broken legs --
Fairness tastes like chocolate --
Mental magic tricks --
Mirror mirror --
Peaks and valleys --
Trojan horse selves --
Panoptic self-control --
Educating the social brain --
Epilogue.
Responsibility: Matthew D. Lieberman.

Abstract:

We are profoundly social creatures. Here, renowned psychologist Matthew Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience revealing that our need to connect with other people is even more fundamental than our need for food or shelter. Because of this, our brain uses its spare time to learn about the social world--other people and our relation to them. He argues that our need to reach out to and connect with others is a primary driver behind our behavior. We have a unique ability to read other people's minds, to figure out their hopes, fears, and motivations, allowing us to effectively coordinate our lives with one another. And our most private sense of who we are is intimately linked to the important people and groups in our lives. The insights revealed in this pioneering book suggest ways to improve learning in schools, make the workplace more productive, and improve our overall well-being.--Publisher information.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(4)

User lists with this item (6)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/830668575>
library:oclcnum"830668575"
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/830668575>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/866540>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Cognitive neuroscience"@en
schema:name"Cognitive neuroscience."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"First edition."
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2013"
schema:description"Who are we? -- The brains' passion -- Broken hearts and broken legs -- Fairness tastes like chocolate -- Mental magic tricks -- Mirror mirror -- Peaks and valleys -- Trojan horse selves -- Panoptic self-control -- Educating the social brain -- Epilogue."@en
schema:description"We are profoundly social creatures. Here, renowned psychologist Matthew Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience revealing that our need to connect with other people is even more fundamental than our need for food or shelter. Because of this, our brain uses its spare time to learn about the social world--other people and our relation to them. He argues that our need to reach out to and connect with others is a primary driver behind our behavior. We have a unique ability to read other people's minds, to figure out their hopes, fears, and motivations, allowing us to effectively coordinate our lives with one another. And our most private sense of who we are is intimately linked to the important people and groups in our lives. The insights revealed in this pioneering book suggest ways to improve learning in schools, make the workplace more productive, and improve our overall well-being.--Publisher information."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1214135663>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Social : why our brains are wired to connect"@en
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.