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Soliciting darkness : Pindar, obscurity, and the classical tradition

Author: John T Hamilton
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Dept. of Comparative Literature, 2003.
Series: Harvard studies in comparative literature, 47.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Hailed by Horace and Quintillian as the greatest of the Greek lyric poets, Pindar has always enjoyed a privileged position in the so-called classical tradition of the West. Given the intense difficulty of the poetry, however, Pindaric interpretation has forever grappled with the perplexing dilemma that one of the most influential poets of antiquity should prove to be so dark. In discussing both poets and scholars  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Hamilton, John T.
Soliciting darkness.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Department of Comparative Literature, 2003
(OCoLC)604091119
Online version:
Hamilton, John T.
Soliciting darkness.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Department of Comparative Literature, 2003
(OCoLC)632048566
Named Person: Pindar; Pindare; Pindare; Pindarus.; Pindarus; Pindar.
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: John T Hamilton
ISBN: 0674012224 9780674012226 0674012577 9780674012578
OCLC Number: 53156329
Description: 348 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: pt. 1: Poetry life and war: Pindar and representations of resistance: Untimely citations --
Beneath the sign of Mars --
Ecce Philologus. pt. 2: Arts of Digression: Woven song --
Horace's apiary --
Reforming the Epinicia. pt. 3: Poetica Obscura: Between ancients and moderns --
Voices from within and without --
Poetics of obscurity --
The wanderer's song --
Foreign rhythms --
Remnants gone over.
Series Title: Harvard studies in comparative literature, 47.
Responsibility: John T. Hamilton.
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Abstract:

This study investigates how Pindar's obscurity has been perceived and confronted, extorted and exploited. It addresses issues including the recovery and appropriation of classical texts, problems of  Read more...

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Hamilton ranges with impressive breadth over the history of the European reception of Pindar, represented by scholars such as the great Prussian philologist Wilamowitz and literary admirers from Read more...

 
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schema:description"pt. 1: Poetry life and war: Pindar and representations of resistance: Untimely citations -- Beneath the sign of Mars -- Ecce Philologus. pt. 2: Arts of Digression: Woven song -- Horace's apiary -- Reforming the Epinicia. pt. 3: Poetica Obscura: Between ancients and moderns -- Voices from within and without -- Poetics of obscurity -- The wanderer's song -- Foreign rhythms -- Remnants gone over."@en
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schema:reviewBody""Hailed by Horace and Quintillian as the greatest of the Greek lyric poets, Pindar has always enjoyed a privileged position in the so-called classical tradition of the West. Given the intense difficulty of the poetry, however, Pindaric interpretation has forever grappled with the perplexing dilemma that one of the most influential poets of antiquity should prove to be so dark. In discussing both poets and scholars from a broad historical span, with special emphasis on the German legacy of genius, Soliciting Darkness investigates how Pindar's obscurity has been perceived and confronted, extorted and exploited. As such, this study addresses a variety of pressing issues, including the recovery and appropriation of classical texts, problems of translation, representations of lyric authenticity, and the possibility or impossibility of a continuous literary tradition. The poetics of obscurity that emerges here suggests that taking Pindar to be an incomprehensible poet may not simply be the result of an insufficient or false reading, but rather may serve as a wholly adequate judgment. Book jacket."--BOOK JACKET."
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