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Somanatha : the many voices of a history

Author: Romila Thapar
Publisher: London ; New York : Verso, 2005.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In 1029, Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni raided the Hindu temple of Somanatha (Somnath in textbooks of the colonial period). The story of the raid finds little mention except in the Turko-Persian sources but becomes a major event of Indian history during the raj. It was first depicted as a trauma for the Hindu population not in India, but in the House of Commons. The triumphalist accounts of the event in Turco-Persian  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Thapar, Romila.
Somanatha.
London ; New York : Verso, 2005
(OCoLC)631446176
Named Person: Mahmud, Sultan of Ghazni; Mahmud, Sultan of Ghazni
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Romila Thapar
ISBN: 1844670201 9781844670208
OCLC Number: 56404922
Notes: Originally published: New Delhi : Penguin Books India, 2004.
Description: xxi, 265 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
Contents: The context --
The setting --
The Turko/Persian narratives --
Sanskrit inscriptions from Somanatha and its vicinity --
Biographies, chronicles, and epics --
The perceptions of yet others --
Colonial interpretations and nationalist reactions --
Constructing memory, writing histories.
Responsibility: Romila Thapar.
More information:

Abstract:

"In 1029, Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni raided the Hindu temple of Somanatha (Somnath in textbooks of the colonial period). The story of the raid finds little mention except in the Turko-Persian sources but becomes a major event of Indian history during the raj. It was first depicted as a trauma for the Hindu population not in India, but in the House of Commons. The triumphalist accounts of the event in Turco-Persian sources became the main source for most 19th-century historians. It suited some and also helped the British to divide and rule a multi-millioned subcontinent." "In her new book, Romila Thapar reconstructs what took place by studying other sources, including local Sanskrit inscriptions, biographies of kings and merchants of the period, court epics and popular narratives that have survived. The result undermines the traditional version of what took place. These findings also contest the current Hindu religious nationalism that constantly utilises the conventional version of this history."--BOOK JACKET.

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schema:reviewBody""In 1029, Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni raided the Hindu temple of Somanatha (Somnath in textbooks of the colonial period). The story of the raid finds little mention except in the Turko-Persian sources but becomes a major event of Indian history during the raj. It was first depicted as a trauma for the Hindu population not in India, but in the House of Commons. The triumphalist accounts of the event in Turco-Persian sources became the main source for most 19th-century historians. It suited some and also helped the British to divide and rule a multi-millioned subcontinent." "In her new book, Romila Thapar reconstructs what took place by studying other sources, including local Sanskrit inscriptions, biographies of kings and merchants of the period, court epics and popular narratives that have survived. The result undermines the traditional version of what took place. These findings also contest the current Hindu religious nationalism that constantly utilises the conventional version of this history."--BOOK JACKET."
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