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The sound of tomorrow : how electronic music was smuggled into the mainstream

Author: Mark Brend
Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Monterey Pop Festival, 1967. Bernie Krause and Paul Beaver demonstrate a Moog synthesizer to the assembled rock aristocracy, plugging into a surge of interest that would see synthesizers and electronic sound become commonplace in rock and pop early the following decade. And yet in 1967 electronic music had already seeped into mainstream culture. For years, composers and technicians had been making electronic music  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Mark Brend
ISBN: 9780826424525 082642452X
OCLC Number: 777652910
Description: xi, 272 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Contents: More music than they ever had before --
I like music that explodes into space --
The privilege of ignoring conventions --
Out of the ordinary --
Manhattan researchers --
Because a fire was in my head --
Moog men --
White noise --
It rhymes with vogue.
Other Titles: How electronic music was smuggled into the mainstream
Responsibility: Mark Brend.
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Abstract:

A fascinating history of the inventors, producers and technicians behind the early televisual and cinematic breakthroughs of electronic music, packed with original research and interviews.  Read more...

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Mark Brend's comprensive history of the process by which what was once the marginalised province of academics and solitary hobbyists gradually became absorbed within the fabric of the musical Read more...

 
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