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The speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer : to tell it like it is

Autor: Fannie Lou Hamer; Maegan Parker Brooks; Davis W Houck
Editorial: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, ©2011.
Serie: Margaret Walker Alexander series in African American studies.
Edición/Formato:   Libro : Biografía : Publicación gubernamental estatal o provincial : Inglés (eng)Ver todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
"Most people who have heard of Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977) are aware of the impassioned testimony that this Mississippi sharecropper and civil rights activist delivered at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. Far fewer people are familiar with the speeches Hamer delivered at the 1968 and 1972 conventions, to say nothing of addresses she gave closer to home, or with Malcolm X in Harlem, or even at the founding  Leer más
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Detalles

Género/Forma: History
Sources
Tipo de material: Biografía, Publicación gubernamental, Publicación gubernamental estatal o provincial
Tipo de documento: Libro/Texto
Todos autores / colaboradores: Fannie Lou Hamer; Maegan Parker Brooks; Davis W Houck
ISBN: 9781604738223 1604738227
Número OCLC: 643569409
Descripción: xxxii, 221 pages ; 24 cm.
Contenido: Introduction: Showing love and telling it like it is : the rhetorical practices of Fannie Lou Hamer --
"I don't mind my light shining," speech delivered at a Freedom Vote rally in Greenwood, Mississippi, Fall 1963 --
Federal trial testimony, Oxford, Mississippi, December 2, 1963 --
Testimony before a select panel on Mississippi and civil rights, Washington, D.C., June 8, 1964 --
Testimony before the credentials committee at the Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, August 22, 1964 --
"We're on our way," speech delivered at a mass meeting in Indianola, Mississippi, September 1964 --
"I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired," speech delivered with Malcolm X at the Williams Institutional CME Church, Harlem, New York, December 20, 1964 --
Testimony before the Subcommittee on Elections of the Committee on House Administration, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., September 13, 1965 --
"The only thing we can do is work together," speech delivered at a chapter meeting of the National Council of Negro Women in Mississippi, 1967 --
"What have we to hail?," speech delivered in Kentucky, Summer 1968 --
Speech on behalf of the Alabama delegation at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, Chicago, Illinois, August 27, 1968 --
"To tell it like it is," speech delivered at the Holmes County, Mississippi, Freedom Democratic Party municipal election rally in Lexington, Mississippi, May 8, 1969 --
Testimony before the Democratic Reform Committee, Jackson, Mississippi, May 22, 1969 --
"To make democracy a reality," speech delivered at the Vietnam War moratorium rally, Berkeley, California, October 15, 1969 --
"America is a sick place and man is on the critical list," speech delivered at Loop College, Chicago, Illinois, May 27, 1970 --
"Until I am free, you are not free either," speech delivered at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, January 1971 --
"Is it too late?," speech delivered at Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, Mississippi, Summer 1971 --
"Nobody's free until everybody's free," speech delivered at the founding of the National Women's Political Caucus, Washington, D.C., July 10, 1971 --
"If the name of the game is survive, survive," speech delivered in Ruleville, Mississippi, September 27, 1971 --
Seconding speech for the nomination of Frances Farenthold, delivered at the 1972 Democratic National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida, July 13, 1972 --
Interview with Fannie Lou Hamer by Dr. Neil McMillen, April 14, 1972, and January 25, 1973, Ruleville, Mississippi : Oral History Program, University of Southern Mississippi --
"We haven't arrived yet," presentation and responses to questions at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, January 29, 1976 --
Appendix: Interview with Vergie Hamer Faulkner by Maegan Parker Brooks, July 14 and July 17, 2009.
Título de la serie: Margaret Walker Alexander series in African American studies.
Otros títulos: Speeches.
Responsabilidad: edited by Maegan Parker Brooks and Davis W. Houck.

Resumen:

"Most people who have heard of Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977) are aware of the impassioned testimony that this Mississippi sharecropper and civil rights activist delivered at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. Far fewer people are familiar with the speeches Hamer delivered at the 1968 and 1972 conventions, to say nothing of addresses she gave closer to home, or with Malcolm X in Harlem, or even at the founding of the National Women's Political Caucus. Until now, dozens of Hamer's speeches have been buried in archival collections and in the basements of movement veterans. After years of combing library archives, government documents, and private collections across the country, Maegan Parker Brooks and Davis W. Houck have selected twenty-one of Hamer's most important speeches and testimonies."--Amazon.

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Datos enlazados


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