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Spencer House : chronicle of a great London mansion

Author: Joe Friedman; Mark Fiennes
Publisher: London : Zwemmer, 1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Spencer House is one of the great architectural landmarks of London. Built in the eighteenth century by John, 1st Earl Spencer, an ancestor of the Princess of Wales, it was immediately recognized as a building of major importance and is today the most complete surviving example of its kind, the great London mansions of the nobility and gentry having largely been demolished. Under the direction of its current
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Details

Named Person: John Spencer Spencer, Earl; James Stuart; John Spencer Spencer, Earl; Spencer family.
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Joe Friedman; Mark Fiennes
ISBN: 0302006176 9780302006177
OCLC Number: 29643968
Description: 368 p. : ill. (some col) ; 29 cm.
Responsibility: Joseph Friedman ; foreword by Lord Rothschild ; specially commissioned photographs by Mark Fiennes.

Abstract:

Spencer House is one of the great architectural landmarks of London. Built in the eighteenth century by John, 1st Earl Spencer, an ancestor of the Princess of Wales, it was immediately recognized as a building of major importance and is today the most complete surviving example of its kind, the great London mansions of the nobility and gentry having largely been demolished. Under the direction of its current occupants, the J. Rothschild group of companies, the house has.

recently been the object of one of the most ambitious restoration projects to be undertaken this century and the state rooms are now open to the public. In this first in-depth study, Joseph Friedman highlights the unique importance of the building and argues that the great London mansion was no less significant than the country house in shaping the architectural, social and political history of England. He documents the history of Spencer House from its construction to.

the present day, and examines the revolutionary work of its architects: John Vardy, whose designs for the exterior and ground floor mark the evolution from Palladianism towards a Neo-Classicism inspired by the architecture of ancient Rome, and James 'Athenian' Stuart, who pioneered the use of Greek architectural ornament in the decoration of the first-floor rooms. At a deeper level, the author argues that Spencer House has much to teach us about the all-embracing role of.

the architect in the eighteenth century, and the importance of symbolism, metaphor and allegory. By tracing the sources of the building's design he sheds new light on the philosophy and methodology of eighteenth-century English architecture, and attitudes towards the art and architecture of the past. The successive owners of the house are chronicled, beginning with a history of the Spencer family, in particular John, 1st Earl Spencer, and culminating in a discussion of.

the conditions which led to the letting of the house and the eventual sale of the lease to the J. Rothschild group. The survey concludes with a detailed account of the restoration and the ingenious ideas which guaranteed its success. The book is illustrated throughout with sumptuous interiors, architectural drawings and details, portraits and maps.

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Linked Data


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