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Spies : the rise and fall of the KGB in America

Author: John Earl Haynes; Harvey Klehr; Alexander Vassiliev; Philip Redko; Steven Shabad
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This stunning book, based on KGB archives that have never come to light before, provides the most complete account of Soviet espionage in America ever written. In 1993, former KGB officer Alexander Vassiliev was permitted unique access to Stalin-era records of Soviet intelligence operations against the United States. Years later, living in Britain, Vassiliev retrieved his extensive notebooks of transcribed  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Earl Haynes; Harvey Klehr; Alexander Vassiliev; Philip Redko; Steven Shabad
ISBN: 9780300123906 0300123906 9780300164381 0300164386
OCLC Number: 262432345
Description: liii, 650 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Introduction : How I came to write my notebooks, discover Alger Hiss, and lose to his lawyer / Alexander Vassiliev --
Alger Hiss : case closed --
Enormous : the KGB attack on the Anglo-American atomic project --
The journalist spies --
Infiltration of the U.S. government --
Infiltration of the Office of Strategic Services --
The XY line : technical, scientific, and industrial espionage --
American couriers and support personnel --
Celebrities and obsessions --
The KGB in America : strengths, weaknesses, and structural problems.
Responsibility: John Earl Haynes, Harvey Klehr, and Alexander Vassiliev ; with translations by Philip Redko and Steven Shabad.

Abstract:

Presents an account of Soviet espionage in America. This book offers insights into espionage tactics and the motives of Americans who spied for Stalin.  Read more...

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"This work should serve as the final salvo in the long battle between those who are still in denial regarding KGB espionage in America in the 1930s and 40s and those who assert that this story must Read more...

 
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