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The spirit of laws,

Author: Charles de Secondat Montesquieu, baron de; Thomas Nugent; J V Prichard; G D H Cole; Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Publisher: Chicago, Encyclopædia Britannica [1955, ©1952]
Series: Great books of the Western world, v. 38.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Montesquieu, Charles de Secondat, baron de, 1689-1755.
Spirit of laws.
Chicago, Encyclopædia Britannica [1955, ©1952]
(OCoLC)756435570
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Charles de Secondat Montesquieu, baron de; Thomas Nugent; J V Prichard; G D H Cole; Jean-Jacques Rousseau
OCLC Number: 916917
Description: xxii, 439 pages 25 cm.
Contents: The spirit of laws: Book I: Of laws in general --
Book II: Of laws directly derived from the nature of government --
Book III: Of the principles of the three kinds of government --
Book IV: That the laws of education ought to be in relation to the principles of government --
Book V: That the laws given by the legislator ought to be in relation to the principle of government --
Book VI: Consequences of the principles of different governments with respect to the simplicity of civil and criminal laws, the form of judgments, and the inflicting of punishments --
Book VII: Consequences of the different principles of the three governments with respect to sumptuary laws, luxury and the condition of women --
Book VIII: Of the corruption of the principles of the three governments --
Book IX: Of the laws in the relation that bear to a defensive force --
Book X: Of laws in the relation that bear to offensive force --
Book XI: Of the laws which establish political liberty, with regard to the constitution --
Book XII: Of the laws that form political liberty, in relation to the subject: Idea of this book --
Book XIII: Of the relation which the levying of taxes and the greatness of the public revenues bear to liberty --
Book XIV: Of laws in relation to the nature of the climate --
Book XV: In what manner the laws of civil slavery relate to the nature of the climate --
Book XVI: How the laws of domestic slavery bear a relation to the nature of the climate --
Book XVII: How the laws of political servitude bear a relation to the nature of the climate --
Book XVIII: Of laws in the relation they bear to the nature of the soil --
Book XIX: Of laws in relation to the principles which form the general spirit, morals, and customs of a nation --
Book XX: Of laws in relation to commerce, considered in its nature and distinctions --
Book XXI: Of laws in relation to commerce, considered in the revolutions it has met with in the world --
Book XXII: Of laws in relation to the use of money --
Book XXIII: Of laws in the relation they bear to the number of inhabitants --
Book XXIV: Of laws in relation to religion, considered in itself, and in its doctrine --
Book XXV: Of laws in relation to the establishment of religion and its external polity --
Book XXVI: Of laws in relation to the order of things which they determine --
Book XXVII: Of the origin and revolutions of the Roman law on successions --
Book XXVIII: Of the origin and revolutions of the civil laws among the French --
Book XXIX: Of the manner of composing the laws --
Book XXX: Theory of the feudal laws amonng the Franks in the relation they bear to the establishment of the monarchy --
Book XXXI: Theory of the feudal laws among the Franks in relation they bear to the revolutions of their monarchy. A discourse on the origin of inequality --
A discourse on political economy --
The social contract: Book I: The subject of the first book. The first societies. The right of the strongest. Slavery. That we must always go back to a first convention. The social compact. The sovereign. The civil state. Real property. --
Book II:. That sovereignty is inalienable. That sovereignty is indivisible. Whether the general will is fallible. The limits of the sovereign power. The right of life and death. Law. The legislature. The people. The various systems of legislation. The division of the laws. --
Book. III:. Government in general. The constituent principle in the various forms of government. The division of governments. Democracy. Aristocracy. Monarchy. Mixed governments. That all forms of government do not suit all countries. The marks of a good government. The abuse of government and its tendency to degenerate. The death of the body politic. How the sovereign authority maintains itself. Deputies or representatives. That the institution of government is not a contract. The institution of government. How the check the usurpations of government. --
Book IV: That the general will is indestructible. Voting. Elections. The Roman comitia. The tribunate. The dictatorship. The censorship. Civil religion. Conclusion.
Series Title: Great books of the Western world, v. 38.
Other Titles: De l'esprit des lois.
Responsibility: by Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu. [Translated by Thomas Nugent, rev. by J.V. Prichard] On the origin of inequality. On political economy. The social contract. By Jean Jacques Rousseau. [Translated by G.D.H. Cole].

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