skip to content
 A Stage Model of Social Movement Co-optation:... Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

A Stage Model of Social Movement Co-optation: Community Mediation in the United States

Author: Patrick G Coy; Tim Hedeen
Publisher: DigitalCommons@Kennesaw State University 2005-07-01T07:00:00Z
Edition/Format:   Downloadable archival material
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The community mediation movement in the United States arose in the late 1970s as an alternative to a formalized justice system that was perceived to be costly, time consuming, and unresponsive to individual and community needs. Community mediation advocates also valued community training, social justice, volunteerism, empowerment, and local control over conflict resolution mechanisms. But over the past quarter  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: text
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Patrick G Coy; Tim Hedeen
OCLC Number: 727792133

Abstract:

The community mediation movement in the United States arose in the late 1970s as an alternative to a formalized justice system that was perceived to be costly, time consuming, and unresponsive to individual and community needs. Community mediation advocates also valued community training, social justice, volunteerism, empowerment, and local control over conflict resolution mechanisms. But over the past quarter century, community mediation has become increasingly institutionalized and has undergone various degrees of co-optation in its evolving relationship with the court system. Drawing on the literatures of dispute resolution, co-optation, and social movements, we analyze the evolution of community mediation and identify the degrees and dimensions of its co-optation. Thus, we develop a four-stage model of co-optation as it has occurred within the community mediation movement, identifying multiple steps in each stage. This analysis facilitates greater understanding of specific events, particular processes, and individual decisions and dilemmas that mediation activists face in their working relationships with their communities and the formal legal system. Further, scholars studying similar processes in other social movements may find that this stage model of co-optation, in whole or in part, is useful to their analyses of other movements.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/727792133>
library:oclcnum"727792133"
rdf:typelibrary:ArchiveMaterial
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2005/07/01T07:00:00Z"
schema:datePublished"2005"
schema:description"The community mediation movement in the United States arose in the late 1970s as an alternative to a formalized justice system that was perceived to be costly, time consuming, and unresponsive to individual and community needs. Community mediation advocates also valued community training, social justice, volunteerism, empowerment, and local control over conflict resolution mechanisms. But over the past quarter century, community mediation has become increasingly institutionalized and has undergone various degrees of co-optation in its evolving relationship with the court system. Drawing on the literatures of dispute resolution, co-optation, and social movements, we analyze the evolution of community mediation and identify the degrees and dimensions of its co-optation. Thus, we develop a four-stage model of co-optation as it has occurred within the community mediation movement, identifying multiple steps in each stage. This analysis facilitates greater understanding of specific events, particular processes, and individual decisions and dilemmas that mediation activists face in their working relationships with their communities and the formal legal system. Further, scholars studying similar processes in other social movements may find that this stage model of co-optation, in whole or in part, is useful to their analyses of other movements."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/905386799>
schema:genre"text"
schema:name"A Stage Model of Social Movement Co-optation: Community Mediation in the United States"
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:url<http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1533-8525.2005.00020.x>
schema:url<http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/facpubs/64>
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.