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Steele family correspondence, 1853-1903

Author: Steele family.
Edition/Format:   Archival material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The collection contains thirty letters, all but one of which are addressed to Ellen (or Ellen and David) Sturges from her immediate family (and one friend, identified only as "Rebecca") in Ann Arbor. The aberrant letter was written in 1856 to David B. Sturges from Ellen (it is unclear if they were already married at this point). The correspondence contains detailed descriptions of the failing health and treatment of  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Letters (correspondence)
Named Person: Ulysses S Grant; Steele family.; Ulysses S Grant
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Steele family.
OCLC Number: 660038529
Notes: All inquiries about this collection should be directed to the H. Russell Smith Foundation Curator, Western American Manuscripts.
Description: 33 items.
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Abstract:

The collection contains thirty letters, all but one of which are addressed to Ellen (or Ellen and David) Sturges from her immediate family (and one friend, identified only as "Rebecca") in Ann Arbor. The aberrant letter was written in 1856 to David B. Sturges from Ellen (it is unclear if they were already married at this point). The correspondence contains detailed descriptions of the failing health and treatment of Julia and Valentine Steele in the months leading up to their deaths. There are occasional references to cultural and religious life in Ann Arbor in the letters of the 1866-1876 period, especially regarding the growth of the Methodist Church and the public speeches of Erastus Otis Haven (1863-1869), the second president of the University of Michigan and pastor of the First United Methodist Church. Though politics and national affairs are rarely discussed, HM 73855 includes Phebe Steele's thoughts on President Ulysses S. Grant's unsuccessful bid for a third term. Ebenezer and Phebe Steele express deep anxiety throughout the 1866 correspondence as to their daughter's safety from Indians in Montana, though no specific events are referenced. In addition to the correspondence, there is a family record, believed to be in the hand of Phebe Steele, detailing the birth and death dates of the siblings and parents of Ebenezer Steele, as well as a folder containing seven empty envelopes.

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