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The story of scientific psychology

Author: Adelbert Ford
Publisher: New York, Sears Pub. Co. [©1932]
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Curiosity may have killed the cat, caused the downfall of Eve, brought disgrace upon Pandora, as the musty myths advise us, but it appears to be the psychological mainspring which pushes the human race to higher and higher levels of adaptive attainment. Therein lies one of the appeals of the scientific laboratory: the interesting possibility that one may find something extremely potent in human affairs. It was  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Ford, Adelbert, 1890-
Story of scientific psychology.
New York, Sears Pub. Co. [©1932]
(DLC) 32034240
(OCoLC)1807479
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Adelbert Ford
OCLC Number: 565182395
Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL
Description: 1 online resource (xii, 307 pages) illustrations, diagrams
Details: Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Other Titles: Scientific psychology, The story of.
Responsibility: by Adelbert Ford ...

Abstract:

"Curiosity may have killed the cat, caused the downfall of Eve, brought disgrace upon Pandora, as the musty myths advise us, but it appears to be the psychological mainspring which pushes the human race to higher and higher levels of adaptive attainment. Therein lies one of the appeals of the scientific laboratory: the interesting possibility that one may find something extremely potent in human affairs. It was Pasteur who actually accomplished the Alice in Wonderland stunt of crawling through the keyhole. That was an expedition! For by the process of using a microscope he secured the same effect as if he had swallowed the medicine for making himself smaller. And he came back from that expedition to build a new science, to turn medical practice upside down, to add ten years to the human life span, to leave his name ringing through a thousand lecture halls in every known language. The crashing climax of a far-reaching scientific discovery contains the power to sustain the patience of many another scientific worker until he arrives over the dreary road to achievement. And the electric quality of that finding probably contains the force that will entice many a new disciple; for the public appreciates the value of the end results, whether or not it knows the cost and effort, the sacrifices and pains that have gone before the discovery of scientific principles. Knowing that the layman can do much for the growth of science by a more intelligent understanding of the events and procedures, and knowing that in every human breast there exists a craving for adventure into unsolved mysteries, I have written this book to present something of the dramatic history of the science of psychology, showing the peculiar part played by the personalities of research men, the sacrifices made to achieve pure scientific truth, and the nature of some of the findings made in the process of attaining predictability in a subject which was for years in the hands of the mystics. Frankly, I am writing this for the intelligent layman, hoping that I may present the subject matter of psychology, in its historical setting, with fidelity, and with all the degree of accuracy I am capable of mustering, yet without sacrificing the dramatic quality of the story which contains a considerable amount of emotional drive. The average scientist is afraid of emotionalism. He knows that the spirit of the crusader does not belong in science. He knows that upon the entrance of strong feelings cold logic must depart. He sees himself as an impartial recording instrument of the truth, and the repression of feeling, necessary for the most unbiased kind of investigation, may be carried to the point of belittlement of the very discoveries which have the most far-reaching importance to the human race. To have emotion is to distort the logical framework of scientific system. In spite of which, with a fear lest humanness may create distortion, I present a narrative account of a very important modern science"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).

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