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Storytracking : texts, stories & histories in Central Australia

Author: Sam D Gill
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Storytracking is a work of theory and application. It is both a study of history and culture and of the academic issues accompanying the interpretation and observation of other peoples. Sam Gill writes about Central Australia, but, more importantly, he writes about the business of trying to live responsibly and decisively in a postmodern world faced with irreconcilable diversity and complexity, with undeniable  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Folklore
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Sam D Gill
ISBN: 0195115872 9780195115871 0195115880 9780195115888
OCLC Number: 36066054
Description: xi, 276 pages ; 24 cm
Responsibility: Sam D. Gill.
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Abstract:

This work takes the narrative technique of "storytracking", as practised by Australian aboriginal peoples, and applies it to the academic study of their culture. The author proposes to get as close  Read more...

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The strength of this book lies in its points of intersection, its detailed comparisons, and the emergence of a kind of narrative cohesion around differing interpretations of the Numbakulla texts. Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Storytracking is a work of theory and application. It is both a study of history and culture and of the academic issues accompanying the interpretation and observation of other peoples. Sam Gill writes about Central Australia, but, more importantly, he writes about the business of trying to live responsibly and decisively in a postmodern world faced with irreconcilable diversity and complexity, with undeniable ambiguity and uncertainty." "Storytracking includes engaging accounts of many of the colorful figures involved in the nineteenth-century development of Central Australia, and it is an argument for a multiperspectival theory of history. It presents descriptions of an important aboriginal culture - the Arrernte - and it critically examines ethnography. It exposes the colonialist underbelly of all modern academic culture study, yet it embraces the situation as one of creative potential, outlining an interactivist epistemology with which to negotiate the classical alternatives of objectivism and subjectivism. Gill presents an examination of the emergent academic study of religion focused on two exemplary scholars - Mircea Eliade and Jonathan Smith - offering a play theory of religion as the basis for innovative critical discussions of text, comparison, interpretation, the definition of religion, academic writing style, and the role of "the other." Based on painstakingly detailed research, Gill exposes disturbing and confounding dimensions of the modern world, particularly academia. Yet, beyond the pessimism that often characterizes postmodernity, he charts an optimistic and creative course framed in the terms of play."--Jacket."
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