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A study commentary on Leviticus

Author: John D Currid
Publisher: Darlington, England ; Webster, New York : Evangelical Press, 2004.
Series: EP study commentary.
Edition/Format:   Book : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Leviticus used to be the first book of the Bible read and studied by children in the synagogue. In the church, it is perhaps the last one read, if it is ever given any attention at all. One of the reasons that the book of Leviticus is so little studied in the church is a lack of understanding about the relevance of the literature to the New Testament Christian. What do all these legislative texts in the Pentateuch  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Commentaries
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: John D Currid
ISBN: 0852345763 9780852345764
OCLC Number: 58731542
Description: 398 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: Introductory matters --
The name of the book --
The structure of the book --
Authorship and dating: hermeneutics of suspicion --
Leviticus and the New Testament --
Laws of the offerings (Leviticus 1:1-7:38) --
The burnt offering (1:1-17) --
The grain offerings (2:1-16) --
The peace offerings (3:1-17) --
The sin offerings (4:1-35) --
Special cases of the sin offering (5:1-13) --
The guilt offering (5:14-6:7) --
Priestly duties in the offerings (6:8-7:10) --
The peace offerings (7:11-21) --
Command not to eat fat and blood (7:22-27) --
The priestly portion (7:28-38) --
Consecration of the priesthood (Leviticus 8:1-10:20) --
Installation of the priesthood (8:1-36) --
The initial offerings of the priesthood (9:1-24) --
The sin of the priests Nadab and Abihu (10:1-7) --
Further rulers for priesthood (10:8-15) --
Another priestly error? (10:16-20) --
The Cleanliness Code (Leviticus 11:1-15:33) --
The Kashrut or dietary laws (11:1-23) --
Touching the unclean (11:24-47) --
Cleanliness after childbirth (12:1-8) --
Initial tests for infectious skin diseases (13:1-8) --
Chronic skin diseases (13:9-17) --
Secondary conditions developing into skin infections (13:18-46) --
Laws concerning mould (13:47-59) --
Laws of cleansing a person with a skin disease (14:1-32) --
Laws for the infected house (14:33-57) --
Discharges that reflect impurity (15:1-33) --
The Day of Atonement (Leviticus 16:1-34) --
Yom Kippur (16:1-34) --
The Code of Holiness (Leviticus 17:1-26:46) --
Laws regarding animal blood (17:1-16) --
Laws concerning sexual immorality (18:1-30) --
Sundry laws for holy living (19:1-18) --
Further states of holiness (19:19-37) --
Capital offences and other serious crime (20:1-27) --
Priestly rules of holiness (21:16-24) --
Physical defects among the priesthood (21:16-24) --
Exhortation to the priesthood (22:1-9) --
Eating the holy gifts (22:10-16) --
Rules for animal sacrifice (22:17-33) --
Laws of the feasts (23:1-44) --
Lamp and bread of the sanctuary (24:1-9) --
The blasphemer (24:10-23) --
The Sabbath year and the year of jubilee (25:1-22) --
Laws of redemption (25:23-55) --
Blessings of obedience (26:1-13) --
Curses for obedience (26:14-39) --
Repentance (26:40-46) --
Laws of the vow (Leviticus 27:1-34) --
Vows of the sanctuary (27:1-34)
Series Title: EP study commentary.
Responsibility: John D. Currid.

Abstract:

Leviticus used to be the first book of the Bible read and studied by children in the synagogue. In the church, it is perhaps the last one read, if it is ever given any attention at all. One of the reasons that the book of Leviticus is so little studied in the church is a lack of understanding about the relevance of the literature to the New Testament Christian. What do all these legislative texts in the Pentateuch have to do with life in the church? The book of Leviticus is indispensable for teaching the Christian the depth and heinousness of human sinfulness. The chasm that separates a holy God from an unholy humanity stems from this pervasive iniquity. Yet Leviticus holds out a promise that mankind can be made right with God and live according to his statutes. It truly underscores the love of God for his people, and that he has a plan of salvation for them. But one also realizes that the sacrificial system of Leviticus is insufficient and cannot make people right with God. It points out that something greater is needed. It demands a final atonement. Thus, more than any other book of the Old Testament, Leviticus foreshadows and adumbrates the coming of the Messiah and his wondrous work of atonement. - Publisher.

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