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A supposedly fun thing I'll never do again : essays and arguments

Author: David Foster Wallace
Publisher: Boston : Little, Brown and Co., ©1997.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again collects David Foster Wallace's writings on a range of subjects that only he could bring together. From personal narratives to tennis, film, philosophy, and postmodern literary theory, no subject is outside the play of his imagination. In "Getting Away from Already Being Pretty Much Away from It All", a finalist for the 1995 National Magazine Award, Wallace gorges himself  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Foster Wallace
ISBN: 0316919896 9780316919890
OCLC Number: 35318437
Description: 353 p. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Derivative sport in tornado alley --
E unibus pluram : television and U.S. fiction --
Getting away from already being pretty much away from it all --
Greatly exaggerated --
David Lynch keeps his head --
Tennis player Michael Joyce's professional artistry as a paradigm of certain stuff about choice, freedom, discipline, joy, grotesquerie, and human completeness --
A supposedly fun thing I'll never do again.
Responsibility: David Foster Wallace.
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Abstract:

A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again collects David Foster Wallace's writings on a range of subjects that only he could bring together. From personal narratives to tennis, film, philosophy, and postmodern literary theory, no subject is outside the play of his imagination. In "Getting Away from Already Being Pretty Much Away from It All", a finalist for the 1995 National Magazine Award, Wallace gorges himself on corn dogs, gawks at baton twirlers, and gropes toward the true meaning of the all-American Institution the State Fair. In the title essay, one of the most talked about (and frequently photocopied) nonfiction pieces of the-year, Wallace reports with excruciating humor the agonies of enduring forced fun on a commercial cruiseliner. Wallace's sports obsession comes out in an essay about the unfathomable gulf between professional tennis players and the merely excellent. "E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction" explores the deep currents affecting both popular arts and literary craft, while "David Lynch Keeps His Head" is at once a portrait of the artist at work and an appreciation of the far-reaching cultural influence a popular artist can have.

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