aller au contenu
Sweet tea : Black gay men of the South Aperçu de cet ouvrage
FermerAperçu de cet ouvrage
Vérifiant…

Sweet tea : Black gay men of the South

Auteur : E Patrick Johnson
Éditeur : Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2008.
Édition/format :   Livre : Publication gouvernementale provinciale ou d'état : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
"Giving voice to a population rarely acknowledged in southern history, Sweet Tea collects life stories from black gay men who were born, raised, and continue to live in the southern United States. E. Patrick Johnson challenges stereotypes of the South as 'backward' or 'repressive,' suggesting that these men draw upon the performance of 'southernness'--politeness, coded speech, and religiosity, for example--to  Lire la suite...
Évaluation :

(pas encore évalué) 0 avec des critiques - Soyez le premier.

Sujets
Plus comme ceci

 

Trouver un exemplaire dans la bibliothèque

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Recherche de bibliothèques qui possèdent cet ouvrage...

Détails

Type d’ouvrage : Publication gouvernementale, Publication gouvernementale provinciale ou d'état, Ressource Internet
Format : Livre, Ressource Internet
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : E Patrick Johnson
ISBN : 080783209X 9780807832097
Numéro OCLC : 193902257
Notes : "A Caravan book"--T.p. verso.
"An oral history"--Jacket.
Description : xiii, 570 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
Contenu : Some bitter and some sweet : growing up Black and gay in the South --
Coming out and turning the closet inside out --
Church sissies : gayness and the Black church --
Do you get down? : homosex in the South --
Trannies, transvestites, and drag queens, oh my! : transitioning the South --
Sweet magnolias : love and relationships --
Of legends and young'uns : Black gay men across generations --
Epilogue: Why this story now?
Responsabilité : E. Patrick Johnson.
Plus d’informations :

Résumé :

Giving voice to a population rarely acknowledged in writings about the South, this title collects life stories from black gay men who were born, raised, and continue to live in the southern United  Lire la suite...

Critiques

Critiques éditoriales

Synopsis de l’éditeur

"Interjecting apt questions only occasionally, the author allows his subjects to speak for themselves, which they do articulately, colloquially (a glossary is included), and graphically. . . . [A] Lire la suite...

 
Critiques d’utilisateurs
Récupération des critiques de GoodReads...
Récuperation des critiques DOGObooks…

Tags

Soyez le premier.

Ouvrages semblables

Sujets associés :(6)

Listes d’utilisateurs dans lesquelles cet ouvrage apparaît (5)

Confirmez cette demande

Vous avez peut-être déjà demandé cet ouvrage. Veuillez sélectionner OK si vous voulez poursuivre avec cette demande quand même.

Données liées


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/193902257>
library:oclcnum"193902257"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/193902257>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"2008"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2008"
schema:description"Some bitter and some sweet : growing up Black and gay in the South -- Coming out and turning the closet inside out -- Church sissies : gayness and the Black church -- Do you get down? : homosex in the South -- Trannies, transvestites, and drag queens, oh my! : transitioning the South -- Sweet magnolias : love and relationships -- Of legends and young'uns : Black gay men across generations -- Epilogue: Why this story now?"@en
schema:description""Giving voice to a population rarely acknowledged in southern history, Sweet Tea collects life stories from black gay men who were born, raised, and continue to live in the southern United States. E. Patrick Johnson challenges stereotypes of the South as 'backward' or 'repressive,' suggesting that these men draw upon the performance of 'southernness'--politeness, coded speech, and religiosity, for example--to legitimate themselves as members of both southern and black cultures. At the same time, Johnson argues, they deploy those same codes to establish and build friendship networks and find sexual partners and life partners. Traveling to every southern state, Johnson conducted interviews with more than seventy black gay men between the ages of 19 and 93--lawyers, hairdressers, ministers, artists, doctors, architects, students, professors, and corporate executives, as well as the retired and unemployed. Sweet Tea is arranged according to themes echoed in their narratives. Chapters explore unique experiences as well as shared ones, from coming out stories and church life to homosex and love relationships. The voices collected here dispute the idea that gay subcultures flourish primarily in northern, secular, urban areas. In addition to filling in a gap in the sexual history of the South, Sweet Tea offers a window into the ways that black gay men negotiate their sexual and racial identities with their southern cultural and religious identities. The interviews also reveal how they build and maintain community in many spaces and activities, some of which may appear to be antigay. Through Johnson's use of critical performance ethnography, Sweet Tea validates the lives of these black gay men and reinforces the role of storytelling in both African American and southern cultures"--Publisher description."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/801288275>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Sweet tea : Black gay men of the South"@en
schema:numberOfPages"570"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Fermer la fenêtre

Veuillez vous identifier dans WorldCat 

Vous n’avez pas de compte? Vous pouvez facilement créer un compte gratuit.