skip to content
Swimming to Antarctica : tales of a long-distance swimmer Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Swimming to Antarctica : tales of a long-distance swimmer

Author: Lynne Cox
Publisher: New York : A.A. Knopf, ©2004.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
At age fourteen, she swam twenty-six miles from Catalina Island to the California mainland. At ages fifteen and sixteen, she broke the men's and women's world records for swimming the English Channel-a thirty-three-mile crossing in nine hours, thirty-six minutes. At eighteen, she swam the twenty-mile Cook Strait between North and South Islands of New Zealand, was caught on a massive swell, found herself after five  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Cox, Lynne, 1957-
Swimming to Antarctica.
New York : A.A. Knopf, c2004
(OCoLC)647511985
Named Person: Lynne Cox
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Lynne Cox
ISBN: 0375415076 9780375415074
OCLC Number: 52271444
Description: ix, 323 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: A cold day in August --
Beginnings --
Leaving home --
Open water --
Twenty-six miles across the sea --
English channel --
White cliffs of Dover --
Homecoming --
Invitation to Egypt --
Lost in the fog --
Cook Strait, New Zealand --
Human research subject --
The Strait of Magellan --
Around the Cape of Good Hope --
Around the world in eighty days --
Glacier bay --
Facing the bomb --
The A-team --
Mind-blowing --
Debate --
Across the Bering Strait --
Success --
Siberia's gold medal --
Swimming to Antarctica.
Responsibility: Lynne Cox.
More information:

Abstract:

At age fourteen, she swam twenty-six miles from Catalina Island to the California mainland. At ages fifteen and sixteen, she broke the men's and women's world records for swimming the English Channel-a thirty-three-mile crossing in nine hours, thirty-six minutes. At eighteen, she swam the twenty-mile Cook Strait between North and South Islands of New Zealand, was caught on a massive swell, found herself after five hours farther from the finish than when she started, and still completed the swim. She was the first to swim the Strait of Magellan, the most treacherous three-mile stretch of water in the world. The first to swim the Bering Strait-the channel that forms the boundary line between the United States and Russia-from Alaska to Siberia, thereby opening the U.S.-Soviet border for the first time in forty-eight years, swimming in thirty-eight-degree water in four-foot waves without a shark cage, wet suit, or lanolin grease. The first to swim the Cape of Good Hope (a shark emerged from the kelp, its jaws wide open, and was shot as it headed straight for her). In this extraordinary book, the world's most extraordinary distance swimmer writes about her emotional and spiritual need to swim and about the almost mystical act of swimming itself. Lynne Cox trained hard from age nine, working with an Olympic coach, swimming five to twelve miles each day in the Pacific. At age eleven, she swam even when hail made the water "like cold tapioca pudding" and was told she would one day swim the English Channel. Four years later-not yet out of high school-she broke the men's and women's world records for the Channel swim. In 1987, she swam the Bering Strait from America to the Soviet Union-a feat that, according to Gorbachev, helped diminish tensions between Russia and the United States. Lynne Cox's relationship with the water is almost mystical: she describes swimming as flying, and remembers swimming at night through flocks of flying fish the size of mockingbirds, remembers being escorted by a pod of dolphins that came to her off New Zealand. She has a photographic memory of her swims. She tells us how she conceived of, planned, and trained for each, and re-creates for us the experience of swimming (almost) unswimmable bodies of water, including her most recent astonishing one-mile swim to Antarctica in thirty-two-degree water without a wet suit. She tells us how, through training and by taking advantage of her naturally plump physique, she is able to create more heat in the water than she loses. Lynne Cox has swum the Mediterranean, the three-mile Strait of Messina, under the ancient bridges of Kunning Lake, below the old summer palace of the emperor of China in Beijing. Breaking records no longer interests her. She writes about the ways in which these swims instead became vehicles for personal goals, how she sees herself as the lone swimmer among the waves, pitting her courage against the odds, drawn to dangerous places and treacherous waters that, since ancient times, have challenged sailors in ships.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/52271444>
library:oclcnum"52271444"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/52271444>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:copyrightYear"2004"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2004"
schema:description"At age fourteen, she swam twenty-six miles from Catalina Island to the California mainland. At ages fifteen and sixteen, she broke the men's and women's world records for swimming the English Channel-a thirty-three-mile crossing in nine hours, thirty-six minutes. At eighteen, she swam the twenty-mile Cook Strait between North and South Islands of New Zealand, was caught on a massive swell, found herself after five hours farther from the finish than when she started, and still completed the swim. She was the first to swim the Strait of Magellan, the most treacherous three-mile stretch of water in the world. The first to swim the Bering Strait-the channel that forms the boundary line between the United States and Russia-from Alaska to Siberia, thereby opening the U.S.-Soviet border for the first time in forty-eight years, swimming in thirty-eight-degree water in four-foot waves without a shark cage, wet suit, or lanolin grease. The first to swim the Cape of Good Hope (a shark emerged from the kelp, its jaws wide open, and was shot as it headed straight for her). In this extraordinary book, the world's most extraordinary distance swimmer writes about her emotional and spiritual need to swim and about the almost mystical act of swimming itself. Lynne Cox trained hard from age nine, working with an Olympic coach, swimming five to twelve miles each day in the Pacific. At age eleven, she swam even when hail made the water "like cold tapioca pudding" and was told she would one day swim the English Channel. Four years later-not yet out of high school-she broke the men's and women's world records for the Channel swim. In 1987, she swam the Bering Strait from America to the Soviet Union-a feat that, according to Gorbachev, helped diminish tensions between Russia and the United States. Lynne Cox's relationship with the water is almost mystical: she describes swimming as flying, and remembers swimming at night through flocks of flying fish the size of mockingbirds, remembers being escorted by a pod of dolphins that came to her off New Zealand. She has a photographic memory of her swims. She tells us how she conceived of, planned, and trained for each, and re-creates for us the experience of swimming (almost) unswimmable bodies of water, including her most recent astonishing one-mile swim to Antarctica in thirty-two-degree water without a wet suit. She tells us how, through training and by taking advantage of her naturally plump physique, she is able to create more heat in the water than she loses. Lynne Cox has swum the Mediterranean, the three-mile Strait of Messina, under the ancient bridges of Kunning Lake, below the old summer palace of the emperor of China in Beijing. Breaking records no longer interests her. She writes about the ways in which these swims instead became vehicles for personal goals, how she sees herself as the lone swimmer among the waves, pitting her courage against the odds, drawn to dangerous places and treacherous waters that, since ancient times, have challenged sailors in ships."@en
schema:description"A cold day in August -- Beginnings -- Leaving home -- Open water -- Twenty-six miles across the sea -- English channel -- White cliffs of Dover -- Homecoming -- Invitation to Egypt -- Lost in the fog -- Cook Strait, New Zealand -- Human research subject -- The Strait of Magellan -- Around the Cape of Good Hope -- Around the world in eighty days -- Glacier bay -- Facing the bomb -- The A-team -- Mind-blowing -- Debate -- Across the Bering Strait -- Success -- Siberia's gold medal -- Swimming to Antarctica."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/585817>
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Swimming to Antarctica : tales of a long-distance swimmer"@en
schema:numberOfPages"323"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.