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Taking advance directives seriously : prospective autonomy and decisions near the end of life

Author: Robert S Olick
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Georgetown University Press, ©2001.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In the years since the landmark Karen Ann Quinlan case, an ethical, legal, and societal consensus supporting patients' rights to refuse life-sustaining treatment has become a cornerstone of bioethics. Patients now legally can write advance directives to govern their treatment decisions at a time of future incapacity, yet in clinical practice their wishes often are ignored. Examining the tension between incompetent  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Case Reports
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Olick, Robert S.
Taking advance directives seriously.
Washington, D.C. : Georgetown University Press, c2001
(OCoLC)606553286
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Robert S Olick
ISBN: 0878408681 9780878408689 1589010299 9781589010291
OCLC Number: 45879858
Description: xix, 228 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The place of prospective autonomy in deciding for incompetent patients --
The ethical foundations of prospective autonomy --
Prospective decisional autonomy --
The problem of personal identity --
Respecting advance directives: putting theory into practice.
Responsibility: Robert S. Olick.

Abstract:

Examining the tension between incompetent patients' wishes and their interests as well as other challenges to advance directives, this title offers a comprehensive argument for favoring advance  Read more...

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"This book will be an important resource for physicians, medical ethicists, and other health care professionals as they deal with the rights and prerogatives of the dying and the legal and policy Read more...

 
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