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Task force report: science and technology; a report to the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice.

Author: Institute for Defense Analyses.; United States. President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice.
Publisher: [Washington], [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.], [1967]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This report presents study results and recommendation intended to illustrate the potential contributions of science and technology to crime control. The report supplements and amplifies the discussion of science and technology in the general report of the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, entitled "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society." Two chapters address the application  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Institute for Defense Analyses.; United States. President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice.
OCLC Number: 264744
Description: xiv, 228 pages illustrations, maps 28 cm
Contents: Foreword / Nicholas deB. Katzenbach --
Preface --
The Commission, the staff --
Chapter 1. Science and technology and the criminal justice system --
Chapter 2. Police operations : the apprehension process --
Chapter 3. Police operations : communications, command, and control --
Chapter 4. Aspects of court management, corrections, and crime prevention --
Chapter 5. Analysis of crime and the overall criminal justice system --
Chapter 6. Criminal justice information systems --
Chapter 7. Scientific research and development program --
Appendix A. Program budgeting for criminal justice systems --
Appendix B.A study of communications, crimes, and arrests in a metropolitan police department --
Appendix C. Fingerprint classification --
Appendix D. Police mobile radio communications systems --
Appendix E. Electronics equipment associated with the police car --
Appendix F. Survey of existing criminal justice data processing facilities --
Appendix G. Information system flow diagrams --
Appendix H. Analysis of the costs of a centralized versus decentralized national inquiry system --
Appendix I. Data analysis and simulation of the court system in the District of Columbia for the processing of felony defendants --
Appendix J. Projected percentage of U.S. population with criminal arrest and conviction records.
Other Titles: Science and technology

Abstract:

This report presents study results and recommendation intended to illustrate the potential contributions of science and technology to crime control. The report supplements and amplifies the discussion of science and technology in the general report of the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, entitled "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society." Two chapters address the application of technology in police apprehension of criminals. Topics considered are the use of technology to reduce police response time, means to modernize the command and control process, and how to relieve the radio frequency congestion in most large police departments. Another chapter discusses aspects of court management, corrections, and crime prevention. The court- management discussion focuses on delay reduction in case processing. Two aspects of corrections addressed are the use of programmed instruction as a rehabilitation aid, and the use of statistical techniques to aid in correctional decisionmaking. Auto ignition redesign and street lighting are discussed as technological means to reduce crime opportunities. A chapter examines the uses of systems analysis for the study of the entire criminal justice system as an integrated whole. One chapter considers the potential role of modern information technology in the development of an integrated criminal justice information system. The final chapter outlines a program of research and development by which the Federal Government can stimulate a major infusion of science and technology into the criminal justice process and counter the broader problems of crime control.

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Linked Data


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