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Teaching equality : Black schools in the age of Jim Crow

Author: Adam Fairclough
Publisher: Athens, Ga. : University of Georgia Press, ©2001.
Series: Mercer University Lamar memorial lectures, no. 43.
Edition/Format:   book_printbook : Biography : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In Teaching Equality, Adam Fairclough provides an overview of the enormous contributions made by African American teachers to the black freedom movement in the United States. Beginning with the close of the Civil War, when "the efforts of the slave regime to prevent black literacy meant that blacks ... associated education with liberation," Fairclough explores the development of educational ideals in the black
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Genre/Form: Biography
Biographies
Material Type: Biography, Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Adam Fairclough
ISBN: 0820322725 9780820322728
OCLC Number: 44905041
Description: x, 110 pages ; 22 cm.
Contents: Liberation or collaboration? Black teachers in the era of white supremacy --
Robert R. Moton and the travail of the black college president --
Black teachers and the civil rights movement.
Series Title: Mercer University Lamar memorial lectures, no. 43.
Responsibility: Adam Fairclough.
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Abstract:

Beginning with the end of the Civil War, this study provides an overview of the enormous contributions made by African-American teachers to the black freedom movement in the United States. The text  Read more...

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"In three essays, Fairclough evaluates the actions of African American educators from 1877 to 1954 in the southern US. First he considers the work of black teachers during the last part of the 19th Read more...

 
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schema:description"Defining the term teacher broadly to include any person who taught students, whether in a backwoods cabin or the brick halls of a university, Fairclough illustrates the multifaceted responsibilities of individuals who were community leaders and frontline activists as well as conveyors of knowledge. He reveals the complicated lives of these educators who, in the face of a prejudice-based social order and a history of oppression, sustained and inspired the minds and hearts of generations of black Americans"--Jacket."@en
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schema:reviewBody""In Teaching Equality, Adam Fairclough provides an overview of the enormous contributions made by African American teachers to the black freedom movement in the United States. Beginning with the close of the Civil War, when "the efforts of the slave regime to prevent black literacy meant that blacks ... associated education with liberation," Fairclough explores the development of educational ideals in the black community up through the years of the civil rights movement. He traces black educator's connection to the white community and examines the difficult compromises they had to make in order to secure schools and funding. Teachers did not, he argues, sell out the black community but instead instilled hope and commitment to equality in the minds of their pupils."
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