skip to content
Testing wars in the public schools : a forgotten history Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Testing wars in the public schools : a forgotten history

Author: William J Reese
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2013.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Written tests to evaluate students were a radical and controversial innovation when American educators began adopting them in the 1800s. Testing quickly became a key factor in the political battles during this period that gave birth to America's modern public school system. William J. Reese offers a richly detailed history of an educational revolution that has so far been only partially told. Single-classroom  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William J Reese
ISBN: 9780674073043 0674073045
OCLC Number: 811238972
Description: 298 p. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Festivals of learning --
A-putting down sin --
Screwing machines --
A pile of thunder-bolts --
Thanatopsis and square roots --
Chewing pencil tops --
The culture of testing.
Responsibility: William J. Reese.

Abstract:

Despite claims that written exams narrowed the curriculum, ruined children's health, and turned teachers into automatons, once tests took root in American schools their legitimacy was never seriously  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

Written tests are the bete-noire of contemporary educational critics, who claim that the tests encourage a sterile and rote pedagogy. But in William Reese's tale, they were originally part of Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/811238972>
library:oclcnum"811238972"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/811238972>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Educational tests and measurements--United States--History--19th century."
schema:sameAs<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85041157>
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:author
schema:datePublished"2013"
schema:description"Festivals of learning -- A-putting down sin -- Screwing machines -- A pile of thunder-bolts -- Thanatopsis and square roots -- Chewing pencil tops -- The culture of testing."
schema:description"Written tests to evaluate students were a radical and controversial innovation when American educators began adopting them in the 1800s. Testing quickly became a key factor in the political battles during this period that gave birth to America's modern public school system. William J. Reese offers a richly detailed history of an educational revolution that has so far been only partially told. Single-classroom schools were the norm throughout the United States at the turn of the nineteenth century. Pupils demonstrated their knowledge by rote recitation of lessons and were often assessed according to criteria of behavior and discipline having little to do with academics. Convinced of the inadequacy of this system, the reformer Horace Mann and allies on the Boston School Committee crafted America's first written exam and administered it as a surprise in local schools in 1845. The embarrassingly poor results became front-page news and led to the first serious consideration of tests as a useful pedagogic tool and objective measure of student achievement. A generation after Mann's experiment, testing had become widespread. Despite critics' ongoing claims that exams narrowed the curriculum, ruined children's health, and turned teachers into automatons, once tests took root in America schools their legitimacy was never seriously challenged. Testing Wars in the Public Schools puts contemporary battles over scholastic standards and benchmarks into perspective by showcasing the historic successes and limitations of the pencil-and paper exam."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1169585460>
schema:genre"History."
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Testing wars in the public schools : a forgotten history"
schema:numberOfPages"298"
schema:publisher
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Harvard University Press"
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.