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That's alright, Elvis : the untold story of Elvis's first guitarist and manager, Scotty Moore

Author: Scotty Moore; James Dickerson
Publisher: New York : Schirmer Books, ©1997.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
When Elvis Presley first showed up at Sam Phillips's Memphis-based Sun Records studio, he was a shy teenager in search of a sound. At first, Sam ignored him, but the teen was persistent, so Sam asked another musician, a guitarist who worked with a local band called the Starlite Wranglers, to get in touch with Elvis. The name of that guitarist was Scotty Moore. After days of desperate attempts, they were ending one  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Moore, Scotty.
That's alright, Elvis.
New York : Schirmer Books, c1997
(OCoLC)622234137
Named Person: Scotty Moore; Elvis Presley; Elvis Presley; Scotty Moore
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Scotty Moore; James Dickerson
ISBN: 0028645995 9780028645995 0028650301 9780028650302
OCLC Number: 36178448
Description: xvi, 271 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Other Titles: Untold story of Elvis's first guitarist and manager
Responsibility: as told to James Dickerson.

Abstract:

When Elvis Presley first showed up at Sam Phillips's Memphis-based Sun Records studio, he was a shy teenager in search of a sound. At first, Sam ignored him, but the teen was persistent, so Sam asked another musician, a guitarist who worked with a local band called the Starlite Wranglers, to get in touch with Elvis. The name of that guitarist was Scotty Moore. After days of desperate attempts, they were ending one session when they began horsing around with a souped-up version of an old blues number, "That's All Right, Mama." Sam Phillips stuck his head out of the control room window and said "What are ya'll doin'?" "Just foolin' around," Scotty replied. "Well, keep it up," Sam replied, and promptly recorded what turned out to be Elvis's first single - and the defining record of his early style. That record launched a whirlwind of touring, radio appearances, and Elvis's first break into Hollywood. Scotty and Bill were there all the way - in fact, they were billed as a group, the Blue Moon Boys. It was only after "Colonel" Tom Parker came on the scene, snatching up Elvis's contract from a local promoter, that the band was relegated to second place and eventually pushed out of Elvis's inner circle. For Scotty, who had been so close to the young singer, losing touch with him was hard. He managed to carve out a place for himself in the recording industry, primarily as an engineer and producer, although he continued to play on sessions for Elvis and others through the '60s, '70s and '80s. Although unhappy about his treatment by Colonel Parker, he has never before told the true story of how Elvis, he, and Bill created the original rock 'n' roll sound. With Bill Black and Elvis both dead, Scotty is the only remaining member of the original trio who can tell the real story of how Elvis transformed popular music - and how Scotty himself created the guitar sound that has become the prototype for all rock guitar that has followed.

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Linked Data


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