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The making of English cricket cultures: empire, globalization and (post) colonialism
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The making of English cricket cultures: empire, globalization and (post) colonialism

Author: Thomas Fletcher Affiliation: Carnegie Faculty of Sport and Education, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Sport in Society, v14 n1 (January 2011): 17-36
Database:Taylor and Francis Journals
Other Databases: British Library Serials
Summary:
The aim of this article is to understand how English cricket cultures have been made, negotiated and, ultimately, resisted in the context of (post) colonialism. I draw upon research undertaken with white and British Asian cricketers in Yorkshire to identify the place and significance of cricket within the everyday lives of British Asian communities. Over the last decade the number of British Asian cricketers  Read more...
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Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Fletcher Affiliation: Carnegie Faculty of Sport and Education, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK
ISSN:1743-0437
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 4839632883
Awards:

Abstract:

The aim of this article is to understand how English cricket cultures have been made, negotiated and, ultimately, resisted in the context of (post) colonialism. I draw upon research undertaken with white and British Asian cricketers in Yorkshire to identify the place and significance of cricket within the everyday lives of British Asian communities. Over the last decade the number of British Asian cricketers progressing into the upper echelons of the game (mainly the English County Championship) has increased. Many within the game (mainly white people) have used these figures to argue that English cricket is now ‘colour blind’. However, I argue that representation is not the equivalent to acceptance and integration, and present evidence to suggest that racial prejudice and discrimination, not to mention inaccurate and essentialized cultural stereotypes of British Asian cricketers, remain firmly and routinely embedded in aspects of the sport at all levels. I argue that the ability of British Asians to resist the hegemonic structures of white ‘Englishness’, by asserting their own distinctive post-colonial identities in cricket, is paramount to their everyday negotiations of power and racism.

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