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The Origin of Camphill and the Social Pedagogic Impulse
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The Origin of Camphill and the Social Pedagogic Impulse

Author: Robin Jackson
Publisher: Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Educational Review, v63 n1 p95-104 Feb 2011
Database:ERIC The ERIC database is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education.
Other Databases: British Library Serials
Summary:
In this paper the origin of the Camphill Movement will be outlined. Particular attention will be paid to the influence of the Moravian Brethren educational model in the development of the Camphill Schools. A key influence which helped to shape Camphill philosophy and practice was the writing of Jan Amos Comenius (1592-1670), a bishop in the Moravian Church, who is widely viewed as the founder of modern education.  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Robin Jackson
ISSN:0013-1911
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 704422294
Awards:
Description: 10

Abstract:

In this paper the origin of the Camphill Movement will be outlined. Particular attention will be paid to the influence of the Moravian Brethren educational model in the development of the Camphill Schools. A key influence which helped to shape Camphill philosophy and practice was the writing of Jan Amos Comenius (1592-1670), a bishop in the Moravian Church, who is widely viewed as the founder of modern education. The paper briefly describes the development by Camphill School Aberdeen and the University of Aberdeen of the BA in Social Pedagogy which takes a holistic--Comenian--approach to the education and care of children and young people. The question is posed whether the social pedagogic impulse can be sustained in the present economic climate when deep cuts are being made in educational and social welfare expenditure.

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