skip to content
THE STELA AS A CULTURAL SYMBOL IN CLASSIC AND CONTEMPORARY MAYA SOCIETIES
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

THE STELA AS A CULTURAL SYMBOL IN CLASSIC AND CONTEMPORARY MAYA SOCIETIES

Author: Jessica Joyce Christie
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Ancient Mesoamerica, 16, no. 2 (2005): 277-289
Database:ArticleFirst
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

 

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy online

Links to this journal/publication

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Jessica Joyce Christie
ISSN:0956-5361
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 359655214
Awards:
Description: 13

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/359655214>
library:oclcnum"359655214"
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/359655214>
rdf:typeschema:Article
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2005-07-01"
schema:description"In Classic Maya society, the stela was an important medium through which historical information was conveyed. Stelae are free-standing stone slabs carved in low relief that usually depict portraits of rulers, which are accompanied by hieroglyphic texts recording the rulers' identity and actions. Recent research has focused on the stela not only as a carrier of information but also as an important cultural symbol in its own right. In 1985, Linda Schele and David Stuart proposed that the Classic Maya called the stela a te'-tun, or stone-tree. This identification led to the recognition of cultural continuities among the Highland Maya in Chiapas who, on occasion, substitute trees for individual crosses on their cross shrines. In 1996, Stuart suggested that the ancient Maya word for stela was lakamtun, or big stone, emphasizing that the stela was an embodiment of the royal self in the sense that it shared some of the divine essence of the ruler. Drawing on epigraphic research, anthropological theory, the ethnographic literature, as well as personal field observations, I propose that certain spiritual and symbolic concepts of the stela continue to live in the crosses among the Maya today and that these concepts should be considered when we evaluate ancient contexts of meaning for the Maya stela."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/71483828>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:isPartOf
schema:isPartOf
schema:name"THE STELA AS A CULTURAL SYMBOL IN CLASSIC AND CONTEMPORARY MAYA SOCIETIES"
schema:pageStart"277"
schema:publisher
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.