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The theory of the leisure class

Author: Thorstein Veblen
Publisher: Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 1998.
Series: Great minds series.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In his best-known work, The Theory of the Leisure Class (1899), Veblen appropriated Darwin's theory of evolution to analyze the modern industrial system." "While industry itself demanded diligence, efficiency, and cooperation, businesspeople - in opposition to engineers and industrialists - were interested only in making money and displaying their wealth in what Veblen coined "conspicuous consumption." Veblen's  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Veblen, Thorstein, 1857-1929.
Theory of the leisure class.
Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 1998
(OCoLC)654153566
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Thorstein Veblen
ISBN: 1573922196 9781573922197
OCLC Number: 38765093
Notes: Originally published: New York : Macmillan Company, 1899.
Includes index.
Description: xii, 404 p. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Pecuniary Emulation --
Conspicuous Leisure --
Conspicuous Consumption --
The Pecuniary Standard of Living --
Pecuniary Canons of Taste --
Dress as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture --
Industrial Exemption and Conservatism --
The Conservation of Archaic Traits --
Modern Survivals of Prowess --
The Belief in Luck --
Devout Observances --
Survivals of the Non-Invidious Interest --
The Higher Learning as an Expression of --
the Pecuniary Culture.
Series Title: Great minds series.
Responsibility: Thorstein Veblen.

Abstract:

"In his best-known work, The Theory of the Leisure Class (1899), Veblen appropriated Darwin's theory of evolution to analyze the modern industrial system." "While industry itself demanded diligence, efficiency, and cooperation, businesspeople - in opposition to engineers and industrialists - were interested only in making money and displaying their wealth in what Veblen coined "conspicuous consumption." Veblen's keen analysis of the psychological bases of American social and economic institutions laid the foundation for the school of institutional economics."--BOOK JACKET.

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