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The theory that would not die : how Bayes' rule cracked the enigma code, hunted down Russian submarines, & emerged triumphant from two centuries of controversy

Autor: Sharon Bertsch McGrayne
Editorial: New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, ©2011.
Edición/Formato:   Libro-e : Documento : Inglés (eng)Ver todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
"Bayes' rule appears to be a straightforward, one-line theorem: by updating our initial beliefs with objective new information, we get a new and improved belief. To its adherents, it is an elegant statement about learning from experience. To its opponents, it is subjectivity run amok. In the first-ever account of Bayes' rule for general readers, Sharon Bertsch McGrayne explores this controversial theorem and the  Leer más
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Género/Forma: Electronic books
History
Formato físico adicional: Print version:
McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch.
Theory that would not die.
New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, c2011
(DLC) 2010045037
(OCoLC)670481486
Tipo de material: Documento, Recurso en Internet
Tipo de documento: Recurso en Internet, Archivo de computadora
Todos autores / colaboradores: Sharon Bertsch McGrayne
ISBN: 9780300175097 0300175094
Número OCLC: 724024998
Descripción: 1 online resource (xiii, 320 p.)
Contenido: pt. 1. Enlightenment and the Anti-Bayesian reaction --
pt. 2. Second World War era --
pt. 3. The glorious revival --
pt. 4. To prove its worth --
pt. 5. Victory 211.
Responsabilidad: Sharon Bertsch McGrayne.

Resumen:

Offers an account of Bayes' rule for general readers. This title explores this controversial theorem and the human obsessions surrounding it. She traces its discovery by an amateur mathematician in  Leer más

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Datos enlazados


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