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The theory that would not die : how Bayes' rule cracked the enigma code, hunted down Russian submarines, & emerged triumphant from two centuries of controversy

Auteur: Sharon Bertsch McGrayne
Uitgever: New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, ©2011.
Editie/Formaat:   eBoek : Document : EngelsAlle edities en materiaalsoorten bekijken.
Database:WorldCat
Samenvatting:
"Bayes' rule appears to be a straightforward, one-line theorem: by updating our initial beliefs with objective new information, we get a new and improved belief. To its adherents, it is an elegant statement about learning from experience. To its opponents, it is subjectivity run amok. In the first-ever account of Bayes' rule for general readers, Sharon Bertsch McGrayne explores this controversial theorem and the  Meer lezen...
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Genre/Vorm: Electronic books
History
Aanvullende fysieke materiaalsoort: Print version:
McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch.
Theory that would not die.
New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, c2011
(DLC) 2010045037
(OCoLC)670481486
Genre: Document, Internetbron
Soort document: Internetbron, Computerbestand
Alle auteurs / medewerkers: Sharon Bertsch McGrayne
ISBN: 9780300175097 0300175094
OCLC-nummer: 724024998
Beschrijving: 1 online resource (xiii, 320 p.)
Inhoud: pt. 1. Enlightenment and the Anti-Bayesian reaction --
pt. 2. Second World War era --
pt. 3. The glorious revival --
pt. 4. To prove its worth --
pt. 5. Victory 211.
Verantwoordelijkheid: Sharon Bertsch McGrayne.

Fragment:

Offers an account of Bayes' rule for general readers. This title explores this controversial theorem and the human obsessions surrounding it. She traces its discovery by an amateur mathematician in  Meer lezen...

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"Superb.#160;"New York Review of Books" --Andrew Hacker "New York Review of Books "

 
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