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There is a place on earth : a woman in Birkenau

Author: Giuliana Tedeschi Brunelli
Publisher: New York : Pantheon Books, 1992.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st American edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From among the many books written by Holocaust survivors, only a handful--like those of Primo Levi and Elie Wiesel--have entered literature to become part of the testimony to the darkest time in our century. They are now joined by a woman, a survivor of Birkenau and Auschwitz, with this powerful, profoundly moving memoir. Giuliana Tedeschi was a young woman from Turin's Jewish intellectual community when she was
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Genre/Form: Biography
Personal narratives
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Tedeschi Brunelli, Giuliana.
There is a place on earth.
New York : Pantheon Books, 1992
(OCoLC)645848593
Named Person: Giuliana Tedeschi Brunelli
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Giuliana Tedeschi Brunelli
ISBN: 0679403035 9780679403036
OCLC Number: 24502365
Notes: Translation of: C'è un punto della terra.
Description: 217 p. ; 22 cm.
Contents: 1. There Is a Place on Earth... --
2. Quarantine in Block 13 --
3. Arbeit Macht Frei --
4. The Presence of Death --
5. Camp B --
6. Schuhkommando --
7. Punishment --
8. Sundays in the Camp --
9. Thirst --
10. The Specter of the Camp --
11. Ruth's Story --
12. Word from Home --
13. At Reveille --
14. "Next Year in Jerusalem" --
15. Auschwitz! --
16. Sandgruben --
17. Christmas --
18. Camp Show --
19. The Voices Again --
20. Toward the End --
21. Bread, Patience.
Other Titles: C'è un punto delle terra.
Responsibility: Giuliana Tedeschi ; translated by Tim Parks.
More information:

Abstract:

From among the many books written by Holocaust survivors, only a handful--like those of Primo Levi and Elie Wiesel--have entered literature to become part of the testimony to the darkest time in our century. They are now joined by a woman, a survivor of Birkenau and Auschwitz, with this powerful, profoundly moving memoir. Giuliana Tedeschi was a young woman from Turin's Jewish intellectual community when she was deported to Birkenau in April 1944. How she summoned all.

her resources to remain human and alive is the subject of this remarkable story, which records not so much the horror around her as the struggle within--the struggle with her spiritual resources. This is a woman's story, seen and felt through a woman's sensibility. It is an account of the destruction of feminine personality, the loss of the body's rhythms, of intimacy, beauty, and the sense of self. What is left is only memory, the acting out of old gestures: pushing a.

baby carriage, rocking an imaginary child. These are the tiny wisps of hope keeping her and her fellow inmates alive from one moment to the next. Yet the camp forces the prisoners also to be ruthless with their most intimate affections lest an unguarded remembrance of their children or husbands leave them vulnerable to despair. What makes this account especially moving are the moments that reaffirm what it means to be human in the face of the abominations of camp.

life--the sight of a starlit sky, a luminous summer sunset as the inmates return from labor in the evening, the harmonious gestures and wild, untamed faces of the girls deftly hauling sewage. What prevails miraculously, setting this book apart from the recollections of men, is a woman's frank love of the body and the senses, a tight bond with the world of feelings, with imagination and dreams. This is the true dimension of this book's inspirational power.

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