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There once lived a woman who tried to kill her neighbor's baby : scary fairy tales

Author: Li︠u︡dmila Petrushevskai︠a︡; Keith Gessen; Anna Summers
Publisher: New York, NY : Penguin Books, 2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Masterworks of economy and acuity, these brief, trenchant tales by Russian author and playwright Petrushevskaya, selected from her wide-ranging but little translated oeuvre over the past 30 years, offer an enticement to English readers to seek out more of her writing. The tales explore the inexplicable workings of fate, the supernatural, grief and madness, and range from adroit, straightforward narratives to bleak  Read more...
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Named Person: Li︠u︡dmila Petrushevskai︠a︡; Li︠u︡dmila Petrushevskai︠a︡
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Li︠u︡dmila Petrushevskai︠a︡; Keith Gessen; Anna Summers
ISBN: 9780143114666 0143114662
OCLC Number: 318411330
Description: xiii, 206 p. ; 20 cm.
Contents: Introduction --
Songs of the Eastern Slavs --
Arm --
Revenge --
Incident at Sokolniki --
Mother's farewell --
Allegories --
Hygiene --
New soul --
New Robinson Crusoes: a chronicle of the end of the twentieth century --
Miracle --
Requiems --
God Poseidon --
My love --
Fountain house --
Shadow life --
Two kingdoms --
There's someone in the house --
Fairy tales. Father --
Cabbage-patch mother --
Marilena's secret --
Old monk's testament --
Black coat.
Other Titles: Short stories.
Responsibility: by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya ; selected and translated with an introduction by Keith Gessen and Anna Summers.

Abstract:

Masterworks of economy and acuity, these brief, trenchant tales by Russian author and playwright Petrushevskaya, selected from her wide-ranging but little translated oeuvre over the past 30 years, offer an enticement to English readers to seek out more of her writing. The tales explore the inexplicable workings of fate, the supernatural, grief and madness, and range from adroit, straightforward narratives to bleak fantasy. Frequently on display are the decrepit values of the Soviet system, as in The New Family Robinson, where a family tries to outsmart everyone by relocating to a ramshackle cabin in the country. Domestic problems get powerful and tender treatment; in My Love, a long-suffering wife and mother triumphs over her husband's desire for another woman. Darker material dominates the last section of the book, with tortuous stories, heavy symbolism and outright weirdness leading to strange and unexpected places. Petrushevskaya's bold, no-nonsense portrayals find fresh, arresting expression in this excellent translation.

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