skip to content
They say : Ida B. Wells and the reconstruction of race Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

They say : Ida B. Wells and the reconstruction of race

Author: James West Davidson
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
Series: New narratives in American history.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Between 1880 and 1930, Southern mobs hanged, burned, and otherwise tortured to death at least 3,300 African Americans. And yet the rest of the nation largely ignored the horror of lynching or took it for granted, until a young schoolteacher from Tennessee raised her voice. Her name was Ida B. Wells." "In They Say, historian James West Davidson recounts the first thirty years of this woman's life - as well as the  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Davidson, James West.
They say.
New York : Oxford University Press, 2007
(OCoLC)607819139
Online version:
Davidson, James West.
They say.
New York : Oxford University Press, 2007
(OCoLC)608208343
Named Person: Ida B Wells-Barnett; Ida B Wells-Barnett; Ida B Wells-Barnett
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: James West Davidson
ISBN: 9780195160215 0195160215 9780195160208 0195160207
OCLC Number: 84152831
Description: xiii, 242 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Contents: Prologue: "Dose this look Natchel" --
1. Into a changing world --
2. A moral education --
3. Unladylike lady --
4. Edged tools --
5. Ambition to edit --
6. They say --
7. Do something --
8. Exiled.
Series Title: New narratives in American history.
Responsibility: James West Davidson.
More information:

Abstract:

As the premiere volume in the new series 'New Narratives in American History', (edited by Davidson and historian Michael Stoff), Jim Davidson proposes a narrative of the first thirty years in the  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"Lynching is the greatest disgrace in our history, and Ida Wells-Barnett was its most courageous assailant. James West Davidson has written an eloquent account of the growth of Wells-Barnett's Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/84152831>
library:oclcnum"84152831"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/84152831>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/72196119>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"1862"
schema:deathDate"1931"
schema:familyName"Wells-Barnett"
schema:givenName"Ida B."
schema:name"Wells-Barnett, Ida B., 1862-1931"
schema:name"Wells-Barnett, Ida B., 1862-1931."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/799481>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"African American women civil rights workers"@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2007"
schema:description"Prologue: "Dose this look Natchel" -- 1. Into a changing world -- 2. A moral education -- 3. Unladylike lady -- 4. Edged tools -- 5. Ambition to edit -- 6. They say -- 7. Do something -- 8. Exiled."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/198672719>
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"They say : Ida B. Wells and the reconstruction of race"@en
schema:numberOfPages"242"
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/84152831>
schema:reviewBody""Between 1880 and 1930, Southern mobs hanged, burned, and otherwise tortured to death at least 3,300 African Americans. And yet the rest of the nation largely ignored the horror of lynching or took it for granted, until a young schoolteacher from Tennessee raised her voice. Her name was Ida B. Wells." "In They Say, historian James West Davidson recounts the first thirty years of this woman's life - as well as the story of the great struggle over the meaning of race in post-emancipation America. He captures the changes that swept the South as Wells grew up in Holly Springs, Mississippi: the spread of education among the free blacks, the rise of political activism, the bitter struggles for equality in the face of entrenched social custom. Davidson traces the crosscurrents of these cultural conflicts through Ida Wells's forceful personality. When a conductor threw her off a train for not retreating to the segregated car, she sued the railroad - and won. When she protested conditions in the segregated Memphis schools, she was fired - and took up full-time journalism. And in 1892, when an explosive lynching rocked Memphis, she embarked full-blown on the career for which she is not remembered, as an outspoken writer and lecturer against lynching."--BOOK JACKET."
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.