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This I cannot forget : the memoirs of Nikolai Bukharin's widow

Author: Anna Larina
Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Co., ©1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
An extraordinary and powerful book, this personal journey through an almost unimaginable landscape of terror, fear, defiance, endurance, and survival will touch a vital human and political nerve. The memoirs of this remarkable woman - the 78-year-old widow of the charismatic Bolshevik leader, revolutionist, and chief theoretician Nikolai I. Bukharin - offer a new dimension to our understanding of Soviet history and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: Anna Larina; Nikolaĭ Bukharin
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Anna Larina
ISBN: 0393030253 9780393030259
OCLC Number: 23384607
Notes: Translation of Nezabyvaemoe.
Includes index.
Description: 384 p., [22] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Introduction: The Afterlife of Nikolai Bukharin / Stephen F. Cohen --
This I Cannot Forget. The Tomsk Camp, December 1937 --
March 1938. Transit Prisons. Mothers and Babies in Prison. Wives of Political Prisoners. Mothers of Disgraced Sons. How Stalin Toyed with Bukharin --
The Bukharin Trial. A Nightmare. The Fate of Her Child and Memories of a Happier Siberian Journey. The Underground Cell. Vision of Golgotha. The Rightist and Trotskyist Oppositions. With Bukharin in the Crimea, 1930. Bukharin's Conversation with Kamenev and Its Fateful Consequences, 1928-1929. Bukharin's Character and Ideals. A Letter to Yezhov and a Poem for Yura. Our Romance, Stalin's Wife, and Premonitions. Deeper into the Gulag. Return to Life --
And to Moscow. Last Months in Moscow after Bukharin's Arrest. Exile in Astrakhan, 1937. The Astrakhan Prison, 1937 --
Moscow's Lubyanka Prison, 1938. Confrontation with Beria. Portrait of Father. Childhood Friendship with Bukharin. Lenin's Death, Father's Death, and New Cellmates. Memories of Trotsky, and a Disturbing Interrogation in the Lubyanka. Bukharin's Last Months of Freedom: The Paris Trip. The "Letter of an Old Bolshevik" and Other Supposed "Recollections" of Bukharin in Paris. The Storm Descends: Stalin and Bukharin. Bukharin's Confrontation with Sokolnikov. Radek's Arrest and Testimony. "I Have Returned from Hell" --
Bukharin, January 1937. Reunion with Yura in 1956. The Last Plenum and Bukharin's Hunger Strike. The Last Good-bye and the First Search. Bukharin's Arrest. Bukharin's Testament --
Epilogue: I Always Believed That the Truth Would Triumph --
Bukharin's Prison Letter to Anna Larina --
Delivered 54 Years Later --
Letters from Soviet Readers
Other Titles: Nezabyvaemoe.
Responsibility: Anna Larina ; introduction by Stephen F. Cohen ; translated from the Russian by Gary Kern.

Abstract:

An extraordinary and powerful book, this personal journey through an almost unimaginable landscape of terror, fear, defiance, endurance, and survival will touch a vital human and political nerve. The memoirs of this remarkable woman - the 78-year-old widow of the charismatic Bolshevik leader, revolutionist, and chief theoretician Nikolai I. Bukharin - offer a new dimension to our understanding of Soviet history and one of its darkest periods. No other widow of the men who "shook the world" survived to publish uncensored memoirs. We have here not only an astonishing family saga of tragedy, survival, and ultimate triumph. Not only the personal story of perhaps the most attractive, admired, and still - mourned old Bolshevik, Bukharin. We have also in Anna Larina a unique voice, memory, and woman's story, as well as much firsthand knowledge from within the revolutionary elite that created the Soviet Union, ruled it until the 1930s, and then was swept away forever in the Crimson tide of Stalin's twenty-year mass terror. A sensation when published in Moscow, and a bestseller in Europe, Norton's edition also has an introduction by Sovietologist Stephen F. Cohen, letters of emotional recollection from Russian readers, photographs, and a newly discovered letter written by Bukharin, excavated from the Kremlin Archive, and delivered unofficially to Anna Larina in June 1992, fifty-four years after he wrote it to her in prison on the eve of his trial and execution.

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Linked Data


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