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This Indian country : American Indian political activists and the place they made

Autor: Frederick E Hoxie
Editorial: New York : Penguin Press, 2012.
Serie: Penguin history of American life.
Edición/Formato:   Libro : Inglés (eng)Ver todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
Most Americans view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. It's assumed that Native history has no particular relationship to what is conventionally presented as the story of America. Indians had a history, but theirs was short and sad, and it ended a long time ago. Here, leading historian Frederick E. Hoxie has created a bold counter-narrative. Native  Leer más
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Detalles

Género/Forma: History
Tipo de documento: Libro/Texto
Todos autores / colaboradores: Frederick E Hoxie
ISBN: 9781594203657 1594203652
Número OCLC: 780480492
Descripción: 467 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Contenido: Erased from the map --
The first Indian lawyer : James McDonald, Choctaw --
The mountaintop principality of San Marino : William Potter Ross, Cherokee --
The Winnemucca rules : Sarah Winnemucca, Paiute --
The U.S. Court of Claims : the Mille Lacs Ojibwes --
The good citizenship gun : Thomas Sloan, Omaha --
Three Indians who didn't live at Taos : Robert Yellowtail, Crow; Alice Jemison, Seneca; and D'Arcy McNickle, Salish --
Indian American or American Indian? : Vine Deloria, Jr., Sioux --
Afterword : This Indian country.
Título de la serie: Penguin history of American life.
Responsabilidad: Frederick E. Hoxie.

Resumen:

Most Americans view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. It's assumed that Native history has no particular relationship to what is conventionally presented as the story of America. Indians had a history, but theirs was short and sad, and it ended a long time ago. Here, leading historian Frederick E. Hoxie has created a bold counter-narrative. Native American history, he argues, is also a story of political activism, its victories hard-won in courts and campaigns rather than on the battlefield. For more than two hundred years, Indian activists have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the American republic through legal and political debate. Over time their struggle defined a new language of "Indian rights" and created a vision of American Indian identity. Hoxie asks readers to think deeply about how a country based on the values of liberty and equality managed to adapt to the complex demands of people who refused to be overrun or ignored.--From publisher description.

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Datos enlazados


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