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Thomas and the Gospels : the case for Thomas's familiarity with the Synoptics

Author: Mark S Goodacre
Publisher: Grand Rapids, Mich. : W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co., 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Gospel of Thomas -- found in 1945 -- has been described as "without question the most significant Christian book discovered in modern times." Often Thomas is seen as a special independent witness to the earliest phase of Christianity and as evidence for the now-popular view that this earliest phase was a dynamic time of great variety and diversity. In contrast, Mark Goodacre makes the case that, instead of being  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Mark S Goodacre
ISBN: 9780802867483 0802867480
OCLC Number: 774490032
Description: x, 226 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: First impressions --
Verbatim agreement between Thomas and the Synoptics --
Diagnostic shards --
Matthean redaction in Thomas --
Lukan redaction in Thomas --
A special case: Thomas 79 and Luke --
The missing middle in Thomas --
Orality, literacy, and Thomas --
Dating Thomas and the Gospels --
Secrecy, authority, and legitimation: how and why Thomas used the Synoptics --
Conclusion: the Fifth Gospel?
Responsibility: Mark Goodacre.

Abstract:

The Gospel of Thomas -- found in 1945 -- has been described as "without question the most significant Christian book discovered in modern times." Often Thomas is seen as a special independent witness to the earliest phase of Christianity and as evidence for the now-popular view that this earliest phase was a dynamic time of great variety and diversity. In contrast, Mark Goodacre makes the case that, instead of being an early, independent source, Thomas actually draws on the Synoptic Gospels as source material -- not to provide a clear narrative, but to assemble an enigmatic collection of mysterious, pithy sayings to unnerve and affect the reader. Goodacre supports his argument with illuminating analyses and careful comparisons of Thomas with Matthew and Luke.

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