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Thomas Jefferson letter to Edward Rutledge 1796 December 27. Preview this item
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Thomas Jefferson letter to Edward Rutledge 1796 December 27.

Author: Thomas Jefferson; Edward Rutledge
Edition/Format:   Archival material : Manuscript : Microfilm : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Jefferson asks Rutledge for 20 bushels of cowpeas, gives instructions on shipping to Charles Johnston & Co., Richmond and payment through John Barnes of Philadelphia, and discusses improvements he has made on the Lieth machine for threshing wheat in Virginia and rice in South Carolina.
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Genre/Form: Letters (Correspondence)
Named Person: John Adams; John Barnes; Thomas Jefferson; Paul Mellon
Material Type: Manuscript
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Jefferson; Edward Rutledge
OCLC Number: 647911619
Reproduction Notes: Also available on microfilm as Manuscripts Division # M-119.
Description: 1 item (ALS. 3 pp.)
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Abstract:

Jefferson asks Rutledge for 20 bushels of cowpeas, gives instructions on shipping to Charles Johnston & Co., Richmond and payment through John Barnes of Philadelphia, and discusses improvements he has made on the Lieth machine for threshing wheat in Virginia and rice in South Carolina.

Jefferson continues with a discussion of how much unmerited abuse and praise he has suffered in public service, his wish for retirement, the outcome of the election of 1796 which he knows Adams will win adding "I know well that no man will ever bring out of that office the reputation which carries him into it. the honeymoon would be as short in that case as in any other, & it's moment of extasy would be ransomed by years of torment & hatred."

He predicts he will live in peace while Adams will be shipwrecked in the gathering storm, but nevertheless urges Rutledge to continue in national public office for "there is no bankrupt law in heaven by which you may get off with shillings in the pound, with rendering to a single state what you owed to the whole confederacy."

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schema:description"He predicts he will live in peace while Adams will be shipwrecked in the gathering storm, but nevertheless urges Rutledge to continue in national public office for "there is no bankrupt law in heaven by which you may get off with shillings in the pound, with rendering to a single state what you owed to the whole confederacy.""
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