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'Til death or distance do us part : love and marriage in African America

Author: Frances Smith Foster
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Conventional wisdom tells us that marriage was illegal for African Americans during the antebellum era, and that if people married at all, their vows were tenuous ones: "until death or distance do us part." It is an impression that imbues beliefs about black families to this day. But it's a perception primarily based on documents produced by abolitionists, the state, or other partisans. It doesn't tell the whole  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Frances Smith Foster
ISBN: 9780195328523 0195328523
OCLC Number: 216938541
Description: xviii, 198 p. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Adam and Eve, Antoney and Isabella --
Terms of endearment --
Practical thoughts, divine mandates, and the Afro-Protestant Press --
Rights and rituals --
Myths, memory, and self-realization --
Getting stories straight, keeping them real --
Alchemy of personal politics --
Me, Mende, and Sankofa : an epilogue.
Other Titles: Until death or distance do us part
Responsibility: Frances Smith Foster.
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Abstract:

Conventional wisdom tells us that marriage was illegal for African Americans during the antebellum era, and that if people married at all, their vows were tenuous ones: "until death or distance do us part." It is an impression that imbues beliefs about black families to this day. But it's a perception primarily based on documents produced by abolitionists, the state, or other partisans. It doesn't tell the whole story. Drawing on a trove of less well-known sources including family histories, folk stories, memoirs, sermons, and especially the fascinating writings from the Afro-Protestant Press, 'Til Death or Distance Do Us Part offers a radically different perspective on antebellum love and family life. Frances Smith Foster applies the knowledge she's developed over a lifetime of reading and thinking. Advocating both the potency of skepticism and the importance of story-telling, her book shows the way toward a more genuine, more affirmative understanding of African American romance, both then and now.

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"Her study of slave marriage does not reveal fragile, transient attachments; rather Foster uncovers a rich legacy of love, struggle, and commitment among enslaved black people. By choosing whom to Read more...

 
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